Ammar, John, SgtMaj

Deceased
 
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 Service Details
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Last Rank
Sergeant Major
Last Primary MOS
9999-Sergeant Major/First Sergeant
Last MOSGroup
Specific Billet MOS
Primary Unit
1973-1974, 9999, MCAGCC 29 Palms, CA
Service Years
1941 - 1974

Sergeant Major

 
 

 Last Photo 
 Personal Details 

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Home State
West Virginia
West Virginia
Year of Birth
1923
 
This Military Service Page was created/owned by Phillip Ammar-Family to remember Marine SgtMaj John Ammar.

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Contact Info
Home Town
Not Specified
Last Address
Cedar Grove, West Virginia

Date of Passing
Aug 12, 1977
 
Location of Interment
Twentynine Palms Cemetery - Twentynine Palms, California
Wall/Plot Coordinates
*Plot: Row 26 A

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Drill Instructor




 Additional Information
Last Known Activity
Retired as Base Sgt. Major, 29 Palms MCB in 1974.
   
Other Comments:
Served as a Major with the California Cadet Corps, from 1974 until his death in 1977.

SgtMaj John Richard Ammar  #132484
 
July thru October 1945 - Corporal - 4Th Bn, (155Mm How), 13Th Mar, 5Th Mar Div, FMF, In The Field.
January 1946 - Military Police - Corporal - Headquarters, 4th Bn, 10th Mar, 2nd Mar Div, FMF, In The Field
 
July 1953 - MOS 4936 - Hq Btry 2Dbn 11Th Marines,Korea - Staff Sgt
July thru October 1953 - MOS 4936 - Servbtry 2Dbn 11Th Marines,Korea - Staff Sgt
January thru April 1954 - MOS 4936 - E Btry 2Dbn 11Th Marines,Korea - Staff Sgt
 
Burial:
Twentynine Palms Cemetery
Twentynine Palms
San Bernardino County
California, USA
Plot: Row 26 A
   


Korean War/Korea, Summer-Fall 1952/Battle of Heartbreak Ridge (Hill 851)
Start Year
1952
End Year
1952

Description
All three of the 2nd Division's infantry regiments participated, with the brunt of the combat borne by the 9th and 23rd Infantry Regiments, along with the attached French Battalion. The attack began on September 13 and quickly deteriorated into a familiar pattern. First, American aircraft, tanks and artillery would pummel the ridge for hours on end, turning the already barren hillside into a cratered moonscape. Next, the 23rd's infantrymen would clamber up the mountain's rocky slopes, taking out one enemy bunker after another by direct assault. Those who survived to reach the crest arrived exhausted and low on ammunition. The inevitable counterattack would then come--waves of North Koreans determined to recapture the lost ground at any cost. Many of these counterattacks were conducted at night by fresh troops that the North Koreans were able to bring up under the shelter of neighboring hills. Battles begun by bomb, bullet and shell were inevitably finished by grenade, trench knife and fists as formal military engagements degenerated into desperate hand-to-hand brawls. Sometimes dawn broke to reveal the defenders still holding the mountaintop.

The battle progressed for two weeks. Because of the constricting terrain and the narrow confines of the objectives, units were committed piecemeal--one platoon, company or battalion at a time. Once a unit could no longer stand the strain a replacement would take its place, until the 23rd Infantry as a whole was fairly well shattered.

Several units up to company size (100-200 men) were wiped out. The Americans employed massive artillery barrages, airstrikes and tanks in attempts to drive the North Koreans off the ridge, but the KPA proved extremely hard to dislodge.
   
My Participation in This Battle or Operation
From Year
1952
To Year
1952
 
Last Updated:
Oct 17, 2007
   
Personal Memories
   
My Photos From This Battle or Operation
No Available Photos

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