Dixon, Eugene, GySgt

Deceased
 
 TWS Ribbon Bar
Life Member
 
 Service Photo 
 Service Details
126 kb
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Last Rank
Gunnery Sergeant
Last Primary MOS
2591-Operational Communication Chief
Last MOSGroup
Communications
Primary Unit
1950-1951, 2511, 1st Bn, 5th Marines (1/5)
Service Years
1946 - 1966
Voice Edition
Gunnery Sergeant
Five Hash Marks

 Last Photo 
 Personal Details 

29 kb


Home State
Oklahoma
Oklahoma
Year of Birth
1929
 
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Contact Info
Home Town
Traverse City, Michigan
Last Address
509 S Birch Street Apt213
Kalkaska. Michigan 49646
Date of Passing
Mar 03, 2022
 

 Official Badges 

USMC Retired Pin


 Unofficial Badges 


 Military Associations and Other Affiliations
Marine Corps Association and Foundation (MCA&F)1st Marine Division AssociationThe Chosin FewYagle Brothers; Detachment 165
Chapter 38
  1967, Marine Corps Association and Foundation (MCA&F)
  2001, 1st Marine Division Association
  2002, The Chosin Few
  2010, Marine Corps League, Yagle Brothers; Detachment 165 (Traverse City, Michigan)
  2011, Korean War Veterans Association (KWVA), Chapter 38 (Traverse City, Michigan)


 Photo Album   (More...



Korean War/First UN Counteroffensive (1951)/Operation Ripper
From Month/Year
March / 1951
To Month/Year
April / 1951

Description
Operation Ripper, also known as the Fourth Battle of Seoul, was a United Nations military operation conceived by the commander US Eighth Army, General Matthew Ridgway, during the Korean War. The operation was intended to destroy as much as possible of the Chinese communist People's Volunteer Army and North Korean military around Seoul and the towns of Hongch'on, 50 miles (80 km) east of Seoul, and Ch'unch'on, 15 miles (24 km) further south. The operation also aimed to bring UN troops to the 38th parallel. It followed upon the heels of Operation Killer, an eight-day UN offensive that concluded February 28, to push Communist forces north of the Han River. The operation was launched on March 6, 1951 with the US I Corps and IX Corps on the west near Seoul and Hoengsong and US X Corps and ROK III Corps in the east, to reach "Line Idaho", an arc with its apex just south of the 38th Parallel in South Korea.

Operation Ripper was preceded by the largest artillery bombardment of the Korean War. On the middle, the U.S. 25th Infantry Division quickly crossed the Han and established a bridgehead. Further to the east, IX Corps reached its first phase line on 11 March. Three days later the advance proceeded to the next phase line. During the night of March 14–15, elements of the South Korean 1st Infantry Division and the US 3rd Infantry Division liberated Seoul, marking the fourth and last time the capital would have changed hands since June 1950. The Communist forces were compelled to abandon it when the UN approach to the east of the city threatened them with encirclement.

Following the recapture of Seoul the communist forces retreated northward, conducting skillful delaying actions that utilized the rugged, muddy terrain to maximum advantage, particularly in the mountainous US X Corps sector. Despite such obstacles, Operation Ripper pressed on throughout March. In the mountainous central region, the US IX and US X Corps pushed forward methodically, the IX Corps against light opposition and the X Corps against staunch enemy defenses. Hongch'on was taken on the 15th and Ch'unch'on secured on the 22nd. The capture of Ch'unch'on was the last major ground objective of Operation Ripper.

UN forces had advanced north an average of 30 miles (48 km) from their start lines. However, while the US Eighth Army had occupied their principal geographic objectives, the goal of destroying Chinese forces and equipment had again proved elusive. More often than not, the communist forces withdrew before they suffered extensive damage. Ch'unch'on, a major communist supply hub, was empty by the time UN forces finally occupied it. As the U.N. troops ground forward, they were constantly descending sharp slopes or ascending steep heights to attack enemy positions that were sometimes above the clouds. By the end of March, US forces reached the 38th parallel.
   
My Participation in This Battle or Operation
From Month/Year
March / 1951
To Month/Year
April / 1951
 
Last Updated:
Mar 16, 2020
   
Personal Memories
   
My Photos From This Battle or Operation
No Available Photos

  50 Also There at This Battle:
 
  • Andresevic, Bill, LtCol, (1947-1965)
  • Brockish, Robert, LtCol, (1949-1974)
  • Cannon, Roy, SSgt, (1948-1952)
  • Goessl, Kenneth, Cpl, (1948-1955)
  • Ivie, Hubert, MSgt, (1950-1970)
  • McCormick, Vincent, Sgt, (1949-1952)
  • Tsegeletos, George, Cpl, (1950-1954)
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