Patch
Unit Details

Strength
Battalion
Type
Ground Unit
 
Existing/Disbanded
Existing
Year
1917 - Present

Description
3rd Battalion 6th Marines is an infantry battalion in the United States Marine Corps based out of Camp Lejeune, North Carolina. Also known as "Teufelhunden", it consists of approximately 300 Marines and Sailors. They fall under the 6th Marine Regiment and the 2nd Marine Division.

Active Years
August 14, 1917 – August 20, 1919
June 14, 1922 – August 10, 1922
June 12, 1924 – November 10, 1928
November 1, 1940 – March 27, 1946
October 17, 1949 – present

Reports To
6th Marine Regiment
 
Active Reporting Units
 
Inactive Reporting Unit
None
 
1607 Members Who Served in This Unit


 

  • Acker, Paul, GySgt, (1953-1977)
  • Ackerman, William (Wild Bill), SSgt, (1961-1975)
  • Acosta, Anthony, SSgt, (1998-2008)
  • Acosta, Raymond, Sgt, (1998-2008)
  • Adams, Geoffrey, GySgt, (1979-1999)
  • Adams, John Porter, LtCol, (1915-1945)
  • Adkins, Brian, Sgt, (1991-1995)
  • Agnew, Joseph, Cpl, (1981-1987)
  • Alexander, Jerad, Sgt, (1998-2006)
  • Alicea, Benji, MSgt, (1992-2013)
  • Allen, Jeff, Cpl, (1988-1992)
  • Allen, Robert, Sgt, (2000-Present)
  • Almanza, James, Sgt, (2004-Present)
  • Almanza, James, Sgt, (2004-2012)
  • Altiero, Brian, 1stLt, (1984-2006)
  • Ames, Stephen, Cpl, (1984-1988)
  • Anderson, Cecil, Cpl, (1999-2003)
  • Anderson, David, Cpl, (1982-1986)
  • Anderson, Michael, SSgt, (1979-1990)
  • Angelucci, Stephen, Cpl, (1991-1995)
  • Angulo, Hector, GySgt, (1998-Present)
  • Archer, Chris, LCpl, (2002-2006)
  • Arellano, Mario, WO, (2000-Present)
  • Argenta, Anthony, Sgt, (1986-1994)
  • Aristy, Daniel, LCpl, (2007-2008)
  • Arnold, Richard, Cpl, (1984-1988)
  • Arriola, Francisco, Sgt, (1975-1983)
  • ARROYO, MILTON, Cpl, (1985-1989)
  • Asher, Steven, Cpl, (1987-1991)
  • Ashley, John, PFC, (1962-1963)
  • Ashley, Kim, Cpl, (1974-1978)
  • Assad, James, SSgt, (1995-2013)
  • Atkinson, Edward R, Sgt, (1950-1954)
  • Auman, Allen, Sgt, (1994-1998)
  • Avery, Ken, Cpl, (1985-1991)
  • Aziz, Hamed, Cpl, (1998-2002)
  • Baciu, George, SSgt, (2002-Present)
  • Backus, Richard, Cpl, (1985-1989)
  • Bailey, Keith, MGySgt, (1978-2005)
  • Bain, Dale, LtCol, (1984-2013)
  • Bain, Thomas, GySgt, (1997-Present)
  • BAKER, JASON, SSgt, (1999-Present)
  • Baker, John, 1stSgt, (1990-2011)
  • Baker, John, Cpl, (1974-1979)
 

Unit Citations - Display as Table
 
Associated Patches
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Associations
 
Unit History
 
Battle/Operations History
  • US Occupation of Germany (Nov 1918 - Jan 1923)




    THE ...

     
    Unit Timeline
    OEF-Horn of Africa
    All Operation Enduring Freedom operations conducted in or from Africa.
    History Icon
    2001 - 2020
    Navy Presidential Unit Citation
    Criteria
    The Presidential Unit Citation may be awarded to units of the Armed Forces of the United States and cobelligerent nations for extraordinary heroism in action against an armed enemy occurring on or aft ... More
    Descriptions
    Operation Moshtarak, Marjah
    2010
    Operation Moshtarak
    History Icon
    2010 - 2010
    Camp Baharia Fallujah, Iraq (FOB)
    Camp Baharia was often referred to by U.S. soldiers by its original nickname, "Dreamland". The Forward Operating Base (FOB) was originally named FOB Volturno in 2003 by the first troops that ... More
    History Icon
    2003 - 2010
    Camp Baharia Fallujah, Iraq (FOB)
    Camp Baharia was often referred to by U.S. soldiers by its original nickname, "Dreamland". The Forward Operating Base (FOB) was originally named FOB Volturno in 2003 by the first troops that ... More
    History Icon
    2003 - 2010
    OIF/Iraqi Surge (2007-08)
    In the context of the Iraq War, the surge refers to United States President George W. Bush's 2007 increase in the number of American troops in order to provide security to Baghdad and Al Anbar Provinc ... More
    History Icon
    2007 - 2008
    Navy Unit Commendation
    Criteria
    The Navy Unit Commendation may be awarded by the Secretary of the Navy to any unit of the Navy or Marine Corps that distinguishes itself by outstanding heroism in action against an enemy (but not suff ... More
    Descriptions
    28Feb06-9Feb07 SU I MEF (FWD)
    2007
    Navy Unit Commendation
    Criteria
    The Navy Unit Commendation may be awarded by the Secretary of the Navy to any unit of the Navy or Marine Corps that distinguishes itself by outstanding heroism in action against an enemy (but not suff ... More
    Descriptions
    8Feb07-8Aug07 SU I MEF (FWD)
    2007
    Operation Iron Fist
    A force of approximately 1,000 Marines, soldiers and sailors from Regimental Combat Team-2 launched an operation against a known terrorist sanctuary in the western Al Anbar province town of Sa&rsq ... More
    History Icon
    2005 - 2005
    Operation Steel Curtain
    Operation Steel Curtain was a military endeavor executed by coalition forces in early November 2005 to reduce the flow of foreign insurgents crossing the border and joining the Iraqi insurgency. The o ... More
    History Icon
    2005 - 2005
    OIF/Iraqi Governance (2004-05)
    In June 2004, under the auspices of United Nations Security Council Resolution 1546 the Coalition transferred limited sovereignty to a caretaker government, whose first act was to begin the trial of S ... More
    History Icon
    2004 - 2005
    Navy Unit Commendation
    Criteria
    The Navy Unit Commendation may be awarded by the Secretary of the Navy to any unit of the Navy or Marine Corps that distinguishes itself by outstanding heroism in action against an enemy (but not suff ... More
    Descriptions
    Afghanistan 18Apr04-21Nov04
    2004
    Training Exercise - Eagle Resolve '04
    Eagle Resolve is the premiere U.S. multilateral exercise within the Arabian Peninsula/Gulf Region and has evolved to become USCENTCOM’s multi-warfare exercise for developing and exercising capab ... More
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    2004 - 2004
    Navy Unit Commendation
    Criteria
    The Navy Unit Commendation may be awarded by the Secretary of the Navy to any unit of the Navy or Marine Corps that distinguishes itself by outstanding heroism in action against an enemy (but not suff ... More
    Descriptions
    Iraq
    2003
    Navy Meritorious Unit Commendation
    Criteria
    The Meritorious Unit Commendation may be awarded by the Secretary of the Navy to any unit of the Navy or Marine Corps that distinguishes itself under combat or noncombat conditions by either valorous ... More
    Descriptions
    5Sep02-17Nov03 SU 4th MEB
    2003
    Operation Southern Watch (Iraq)
    Operation Southern Watch was an air-centric military operation conducted by the United States Department of Defense from Summer 1992 to Spring 2003.

    United States Central Command's Join ... More
    History Icon
    1992 - 2003
    Operation Desert Thunder (Iraq)
    Operation Desert Thunder was a response to threats by Iraq's president Saddam Hussein to shoot down U-2 spy planes, and violate the no-fly zone set up over his country. The operation was designed to b ... More
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    1998 - 1998
    Operation Sea Signal
    Operation Sea Signal was a United States Military humanitarian operation in the Caribbean in response to an influx of Cuban and Haitian migrants attempting to gain asylum in the United States. As a re ... More
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    1994 - 1996
    Operation Uphold Democracy (Haiti)
    Operation Uphold Democracy (19 September 1994 – 31 March 1995) was an intervention designed to remove the military regime installed by the 1991 Haitian coup d'état that overthrew the elec ... More
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    1994 - 1995
    Operation Restore Hope (Somalia)
    The Operation Restore Hope was an operation of the United States and many of its allied countries in Somalia. The operation was protected by the United Nations. The United States was the leader of thi ... More
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    1992 - 1993
    Navy Unit Commendation
    Criteria
    The Navy Unit Commendation may be awarded by the Secretary of the Navy to any unit of the Navy or Marine Corps that distinguishes itself by outstanding heroism in action against an enemy (but not suff ... More
    Descriptions
    Southwest Asia 14Aug90-16Apr91 SU I MEF
    1991
    Operation Desert Shield
    In 1990, fellow Arab Gulf states refused to endorse Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein's plan to cut production and raise the price of oil, leaving him frustrated and paranoid. Iraq had incurred a mountain o ... More
    History Icon
    1990 - 1991
    Operation Desert Storm
    On January 16, 1991, President George H. W. Bush announced the start of what would be called Operation Desert Storm—a military operation to expel occupying Iraqi forces from Kuwait, which Iraq h ... More
    History Icon
    1991 - 1991
    Navy Unit Commendation
    Criteria
    The Navy Unit Commendation may be awarded by the Secretary of the Navy to any unit of the Navy or Marine Corps that distinguishes itself by outstanding heroism in action against an enemy (but not suff ... More
    Descriptions
    Panama 1989-1989
    1989
    Operation Just Cause (Panama)

    On 17 December 1989 the national command authority (NCA) directed the Joint Chiefs of Staff (JCS) to execute PLAN 90-2. JTFSO received the JCS execute order on 18 Dec with a D-Day and H-Hour of 20 ... More

    A. Protect U.S. lives and key sites and facilities.
    B. Capture and deliver Noriega to competent authority.
    C. Neutralize PDF forces.
    D. Neutralize PDF command and control.
    E. Support establishment of a U.S.-recognized government in Panama.
    F. Restructure the PDF.

    At Forts Bragg, Benning, and Stewart, D-Day forces were alerted, marshaled, and launched on a fleet of 148 aircraft. Units from the 75th Ranger Regiment and 82d Airborne Division conducted airborne assaults to strike key objectives at Rio Hato, and Torrijos/Tocumen airports.

    On December 20, 1989, the 82d Airborne Division conducted their first combat jump since World War II onto Torrijos International Airport, Panama. The 1st Brigade task force made up of the 1st and 2nd Battalions, 504th Parachute Infantry Regiment, parachuted into combat for the first time since World War II. In Panama, the paratroopers were joined on the ground by 3rd Battalion, 504th Parachute Infantry Regiment which was already in Panama. After the night combat jump and seizure of the airport, the 82nd conducted follow-on combat air assault missions in Panama City and the surrounding areas.

    They were followed later by the 2d and 1st Bdes, 7th Inf Div (L), while the in-place forces comprised of the 3d Bde (-), 7th Inf Div (L); 193d Infantry Brigade (L) and 4-6 Inf, 5th Inf Div (M), assaulted objectives in both Panama City and on the Atlantic side of the Canal. By the first day, all D-Day objectives were secured. As initial forces moved to new objectives, follow-on forces from 7th Inf Div (L) moved into the western areas of Panama and into Panama City.

    As the lead headquarters for SAC's tanker support, the Eighth Air Force tasked, executed, and directed 144 missions to refuel 229 receivers with over 12 million pounds of fuel. According to General Colin Powell, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, the Eighth’s "air refuelers did not just make a difference in this operation -- they made it possible." This mission introduced the F-117A Stealth Fighter to combat for the first time.

    Air National Guard units participated in the operation because of their regularly scheduled presence in Panama for Operations CORONET COVE and VOLANT OAK. Only Pennsylvania's 193d Special Operations Group (SOG) was part of the integral planning process by the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the Air Staff for the invasion of Panama. The 105th Military Airlift Group (MAG) and the 172 MAG provided airlift support for the operation. They flew 35 missions, completed 138 sorties, moved 1,911 passengers and 1,404.7 tons of cargo which expended 434.6 flying hours. ANG VOLANT OAK C-130 aircrews flew 22 missions, completed 181 sorties, moved 3,107 passengers and 551.3 tons of cargo, which expended 140.1 flying hours. The ANG CORONET COVE units, the 114th TFG and the 18Oth TFG flew 34 missions, completed 34 sorties, expended 71.7 flying hours and expended 2,715 rounds of ordnance.

    Urban terrain provides high potential for fratricide because of the likelihood of close quarters (high weapons density), recognition problems, and unfamiliar secondary effects of weapons. During Operation JUST CAUSE soldiers employed several ineffective and dangerous techniques to breach various fences, walls, and barred doors with grenades, rifle fire, and even anti-tank weapons. Direct fire support, even from just a block away, is very difficult to control. During JUST CAUSE mechanized forces providing fire support were told by brigade a light force had cleared a tall hotel building only to the second floor. In actual fact, it had cleared to the tenth floor and was fighting in a counter-sniper engagement. Seeing this fire and apparently some weapons protruding, the mechanized forces began to suppress. This drew return fire from the friendly light force for some seconds before coming under control. The extensive destruction of civilian housing seen by TV viewers around the world resulted rather from a style of fighting that is based on abundant firepower.

    The high casualties and use of resources usually associated with all-out urban warfare did not occur. The United States suffered 23 KIA and 324 WIA, with estimated enemy casualties around 450. There were an estimated 200 to 300 Panamanian civilian fatalities. Some were killed by the PDF, others inadvertently by US troops. More civilians almost certainly would have been killed or wounded had it not been for the discipline of the American forces and their stringent rules of engagement (ROE). However, the United Nations (UN) put the civilian death toll at 500; the Central American Human Rights Defense Commission (CODEHUCA) and the Peace and Justice Service of Panama both claimed between 2,000 to 3000; the Panamanian National Human Rights Commission and an independent inquiry by former Attorney- General Ramsey Clark claimed over 4,000. Thousands were injured. As it turned out, the figure of Panamanian dead was large enough to stimulate debate over the need for the invasion to remove Noriega, but not large enough to generate a sense of outrage in Panama or abroad, or to turn the Panamanian people against the US intervention or the nation-building program that followed it.

    The US troops involved in Operation Just Cause achieved their primary objectives quickly, and troop withdrawal began on December 27. Noreiga eventually surrendered to US authorities voluntarily. He is now serving a 40-year sentence in Florida for drug trafficking.

    Operation JUST CAUSE was unique in the history of U.S. warfare for many reasons. As the largest single contingency operation since World War II, it focused on a combination of rapid deployment of critical combat power and precise utilization of forward deployed and in-country forces. Impressed by the smooth execution of JUST CAUSE, General Stiner later claimed that the operation was relatively error free, confining the Air-and Battle doctrine and validating the strategic direction of the military. He concluded, therefore, that while old lessons were confirmed, there were "no [new] lessons learned" during the campaign. Despite Stiner's assertions, Operation JUST CAUSE offers important insights into the role of force in the post Cold War period and the successful conduct of a peacetime contingency operation.

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    History Icon
    1989 - 1989
    Navy Meritorious Unit Commendation
    Criteria
    The Meritorious Unit Commendation may be awarded by the Secretary of the Navy to any unit of the Navy or Marine Corps that distinguishes itself under combat or noncombat conditions by either valorous ... More
    Descriptions
    17Jul86-25Jul87 SU 26th MAU (BLT 3/6 Only)
    1987
    Navy Meritorious Unit Commendation
    Criteria
    The Meritorious Unit Commendation may be awarded by the Secretary of the Navy to any unit of the Navy or Marine Corps that distinguishes itself under combat or noncombat conditions by either valorous ... More
    Descriptions
    10Oct-17Nov79 SU 38th MAU
    1979
    Navy Unit Commendation
    Criteria
    The Navy Unit Commendation may be awarded by the Secretary of the Navy to any unit of the Navy or Marine Corps that distinguishes itself by outstanding heroism in action against an enemy (but not suff ... More
    Descriptions
    26-30Apr65 SU 6th MEU
    1965
    NEO - Operation Powerpack (Dominican Republic)
    USS Boxer (LPH-4) was acting as flagship for Amphibious Squadron 10 when she answered an urgent call on 25 April from the United States Embassy in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic. She steamed to the ... More
    History Icon
    1965 - 1965
    Cuban Missile Crisis
    The Cuban Missile Crisis, also known as the Caribbean Crisis or the Missile Scare, was a 13-day (October 16-28, 1962) confrontation between the United States and the Soviet Union concerning American b ... More
    History Icon
    1962 - 1962
    Operation Bluebat (Lebanon)
    Tension in the Middle East began to increase in 1957, when it seemed as though Syria was about to fall to communism. Acting on his recent increased commitment to the region, and in order to protect ne ... More
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    1958 - 1958
    US Occupation of Japan
    The Allied occupation of Japan at the end of World War II was led by General Douglas MacArthur, the Supreme Commander of the Allied Powers, with support from the British Commonwealth. Unlike in the oc ... More
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    1945 - 1952
    Reactivated on Board USS Fremont
    3/6 was again brought back on October 17, 1949, on board USS Fremont and assigned to the 2nd Marine Division. The battalion relocated during August 1950 to Camp Pendleton, California and once again we ... More
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    1949
    3/6 Deactivated at end WWII Occupation Duty
    Deactivated March 27, 1946 following return from Occupation Duty in Japan.
    History Icon
    1946
    World War II Victory Medal
    Criteria
    The World War II Victory Medal commemorates military service during the Second World War.
    1945
    Defense of Iceland Base
    On 7 July 1941, the defence of Iceland was transferred from Britain to the (still officially neutral) United States, by agreement with Iceland, and US marines replaced the British. Iceland's strategic ... More
    History Icon
    1941 - 1945
    Battle for Okinawa
    The Battle of Okinawa, codenamed Operation Iceberg. was fought on the Ryukyu Islands of Okinawa and was the largest amphibious assault in the Pacific War of World War II. The 82-day-long battle lasted ... More
    History Icon
    1945 - 1945
    Surrender of Japan, End of WWII
    The surrender of the Empire of Japan was announced by Imperial Japan on August 15 and formally signed on September 2, 1945, bringing the hostilities of World War II to a close. By the end of July 1945 ... More
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    1945 - 1945
    Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal
    Criteria
    The Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal was awarded for for qualifying service within the Asiatic-Pacific Theater of Operations between December 7, 1941, and March 2, 1946, under any of the following condi ... More
    Descriptions
    Saipan Island, Northern Marianas Islands.
    1944
    Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal
    Criteria
    The Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal was awarded for for qualifying service within the Asiatic-Pacific Theater of Operations between December 7, 1941, and March 2, 1946, under any of the following condi ... More
    Descriptions
    Tinian Island, Northern Marianas Islands.
    1944
    Battle for Saipan

    The Battle of Saipan was a battle of the Pacific campaign of World War II, fought on the island of Saipan in the Mariana Islands from 15 June–9 July 1944. The Allied invasion fleet embarking ... More

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    1944 - 1944
    Battle of Tinian (1944)
    The 2nd and 4th Marine Divisions landed on 24 July 1944, supported by naval bombardment and artillery firing across the strait from Saipan. A successful feint for the major settlement of Tinian Town d ... More
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    1944 - 1944
    Northern Solomon Islands Campaign (1943-44)
    The Solomon Islands campaign was a major campaign of the Pacific War of World War II. The campaign began with Japanese landings and occupation of several areas in the British Solomon Islands and Bouga ... More
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    1943 - 1944
    Navy Presidential Unit Citation
    Criteria
    The Presidential Unit Citation may be awarded to units of the Armed Forces of the United States and cobelligerent nations for extraordinary heroism in action against an armed enemy occurring on or aft ... More
    Descriptions
    Tarawa
    1943
    Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal
    Criteria
    The Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal was awarded for for qualifying service within the Asiatic-Pacific Theater of Operations between December 7, 1941, and March 2, 1946, under any of the following condi ... More
    Descriptions
    Guadalcanal Island, British Solomon Islands.
    1943
    Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal
    Criteria
    The Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal was awarded for for qualifying service within the Asiatic-Pacific Theater of Operations between December 7, 1941, and March 2, 1946, under any of the following condi ... More
    Descriptions
    Betio Island, Tarawa Atoll, British Gilbert Islands.
    1943
    Guadalcanal Campaign (1942-43)
    The Guadalcanal Campaign, also known as the Battle of Guadalcanal and codenamed Operation Watchtower by Allied forces, was a military campaign fought between 7 August 1942 and 9 February 1943 on and a ... More
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    1942 - 1943
    Battle of Tarawa
    The Battle of Tarawa (US code name Operation Galvanic) was a battle in the Pacific Theater of World War II, fought from November 20 to November 23, 1943. It took place at the Tarawa Atoll in the Gilbe ... More
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    1943 - 1943
    American Campaign Medal
    Criteria
    The American Campaign Medal was awarded for For thirty days service outside the Continental United States but within the American Theater of Operations between December 7, 1941, and March 2, 1946; or, ... More
    1942
    Europe-Afica-Middle Eastern Campaign
    Criteria
    The European-African-Middle Eastern Campaign Medal was awarded for for qualifying service within the European-African-Middle Eastern Theater of Operations between December 7, 1941, and March 2, 1946, ... More
    Descriptions
    Iceland Occupation from Jul 1941 to Jan 1942 with the 1st Marine Brigade (Provisional).
    1942
    Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal
    Criteria
    The Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal was awarded for for qualifying service within the Asiatic-Pacific Theater of Operations between December 7, 1941, and March 2, 1946, under any of the following condi ... More
    Descriptions
    Oct 1942, arrived in the Pacific Theater of Operations.
    1942
    Deployed to New Zealand in preparation for War in Pacific
    Deployed during Octoberâ??November 1942 to Wellington, New Zealand
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    1942
    American Defense Service Medal
    Criteria
    The American Defense Service Medal was awarded for service in the Armed Forces between September 8, 1939, and December 7, 1941. Army members had to serve 12 months to be eligible, but Navy and Marine ... More
    1941
    3/6 Reactivated for Service in Iceland Defense
    3/6 was again reactivated on November 1, 1940, in San Diego, California, as the 3rd Battalion, 6th Marines and assigned to the 2nd Marine Brigade
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    1940
    China Service Medal
    Criteria
    The China Service Medal was awarded to Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard personnel who: Served ashore in China or who were attached to any of the vessels that operated in support of the operations in ... More
    1937
    Redesignated as 3/6
    Redesignated again on April 22, 1928, as the 3rd Battalion, 6th Regiment. In October 1928 they moved to San Diego, California
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    1928
    3/6 Deactivated
    Deactivated November 10, 1928
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    1928
    3/6 Reactivated for Service in China
    Reactivated 5 April 1927 at Norfolk, Virginia, as the 3rd Battalion, 6th Regiment and assigned to the provisional regiment.
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    1927
    Redesignation as 1/12
    The Battalion was redesignated October 4, 1927, as the 1st Battalion, 12 Regiment
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    1927
    Nanking Incident (China)

    (March 21–27, 1927) At 3:38 pm, the NRA soldiers and Chinese rioters were driven off by high explosive rounds and machine gun fire from Emerald, Wolsey, Noa, Preston and Carlotto, and ot ... More
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    1927 - 1927
    3/6 Deactivated following Occupation Duty return
    Deactivated February 1, 1925 upon return from Dominican Republic
    History Icon
    1925
    3/6 Reactivated for duty in Dominican Republic
    Again reactivated June 12, 1924, at Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic
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    1924
    US Occupation of the Dominican Republic
    The first United States occupation of the Dominican Republic lasted from 1916 to 1924. It was one of the many interventions in Latin America undertaken by the military forces of the United States in t ... More
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    1916 - 1924
    US Occupation of Germany

    THE Armistice was signed at 5:00 o'clock in the morning of November 11, 1918, on Marshall Foch's train in the Forest of Compiegne, and took effect at 11: 00 a. m. on the same day.< ... More

    Its terms, which are summarized on pages 507-509, required Germany to evacuate all invaded and occupied territory in Belgium, Luxemburg and France (including Alsace-Lorraine), and to withdraw her armies across the Rhine River. They also provided that the Allied forces should be permitted peaceably to occupy bridgeheads, 18 miles in radius, east of the Rhine at Mayence, Coblenz and Cologne, and that a neutral zone 6 miles wide in which neither the Allies nor Germany could maintain troops would be established along the east bank of the Rhine and around each of the bridgeheads.

    The advance of the American and Allied Armies was so regulated that they occupied all territory evacuated by the Germans within a short time after the German troops withdrew. The plans fer the advance prescribed that the French should move through Alsace-Lorraine to Mayence, the Americans through Luxemburg and the Moselle valley to Coblenz, the British to Cologne, and the Belgians by way of Aix-la-Chapelle to the lower Rhine River.

    On November 7 the Commander-in-Chief of the American Expeditionary Forces had directed that an American Third Army be organized and on November 14 this Army, with Major General Joseph T. Dickman as commander, was designated as the Army of Occupation. It was composed initially of the III Corps, containing the 2d, 32d and 42d Divisions; and the IV Corps, comprising the 1st, 3d and 4th Divisions. To these were added on November 22 the VII Corps, containing the 5th, 89th and 90th Divisions. On that same day the Third Army detached the 5th Division from the VII Corps and gave it the duty of guarding the extended lines of communication of the Army.

    The advance to the Rhine was begun by the Americans and Allies on November 17 along the entire Western Front. Although active operations against a hostile enemy were not involved, there were nevertheless many difficult problems to be met. For the Americans, these included the creation in a limited time of a staff and services for the supply and rapid movement of more than 200,000 men through country where transportation lines in many places were completely destroyed and where food was scarce. Moreover, the weather was cold and rainy and in many places the roads were nearly impassable. Although the troops had been hastily assembled and had been allowed no opportunity to rest and refit after the trying period of the Meuse­Argonne offensive, they cheerfully met every demand made upon them. The advance elements of the Third Artillery passed through the city of Luxemburg on November 21 and arrived two days later at the German frontier. There they rested until December 1 when all of the Armies of Occupation pushed on into Germany.

    Through the liberated districts of France and Luxemburg the Americans were received with wild demonstrations of joy, but upon entering Germany they were regarded with a mixture of curiosity and suspicion. However, the fine conduct of the Army and the firmness and justice of the American commanders quickly quieted any apprehensions the civil population may have had and no incidents of hostility took place.

    The leading troops of the Third Army reached the Rhine River on December 9. On the 13th, American, French and British infantry divisions crossed the river, having been preceded in some cases by advance elements the day before. In the American Third Army, the III Corps, whose composition had been changed to include the 1st, 2d and 32d Divisions, was designated to occupy the northern portion of the bridgehead at Coblenz, the southern portion having been transferred to French control. The American bridgehead included the fortress of Ehrenbreitstein located immediately across the Rhine River from Coblenz and dominating it.

    The III Corps crossed on four bridges—two at Coblenz, and one each at Engers and Remagen below Coblenz and by the night of December 14 had completed the occupation of the American part of the bridgehead. The remainder of the American Army of Occupation, consisting of the IV Corps, comprising the 3d, 4th and 42d Divisions, and the VII Corps, containing the 89th and 90th Divisions, remained west of the Rhine. Luxemburg was occupied by the 5th and 33d Divisions, both of which were under command of the American Second Army, and not under control of the Army of Occupation.

    To the south of Coblenz the French occupied a bridgehead with headquarters at Mayence, while to the north, the British occupied a bridgehead with headquarters at Cologne. Although the Belgians advanced to the Rhine and occupied jointly with the French a zone in the Rhineland to the north of the British, with headquarters at Aix-la-Chapelle, they had no force across the river.

    An additional bridgehead at Kehl across the Rhine from Strasbourg and including the ring of forts of that place,was established on February 4, 1919, by the French on their own responsibility.

    When finally located on December 21, 1918, the headquarters of the principal units of the American Army of Occupation in Germany were placed as follows:

    Third Army — Coblenz

    III Corps — Neuwied

    IV Corps — Cochem

    VII Corps — Wittlich

    1st Division — Montabaur

    2d Division — Heddesdorf

    3d Division — Andernach

    4th Division — Bad Bertrich

    32d Division — Rengsdorf

    42d Division — Ahrweiler

    89th Division — Kylburg

    90th Division — Berncastel

    Immediately after the Armistice the American Commander-in-Chief started preparations for moving his forces back to the United States with the least possible delay. The Services of Supply was promptly reorganized to carry out the intricate details connected with this work, and approximately 25,500 men of the American forces actually sailed from France, homeward bound, in November. Before the end of the year this number had been increased to about 124,000.

    Upon the cessation of hostilities practically every man of the 2,000,000 in the A.E.F. wanted to return to the United States at once; but with the limited number of ships available this was, of course, impossible. While military training was continued after the Armistice against the remote possibility that operations might be resumed, the higher commanders realized that this was a most trying period for the soldiers and undertook measures to make life for them as interesting as possible commensurate with the maintenance of a satisfactory standard of discipline and military conduct.

    Men were allowed regular leaves to visit leave areas established at various summer and winter resorts in France and in the occupied portion of Germany, and arrangements were made whereby they could visit several other countries such as Great Britain, Belgium and Italy.

    A vast school system was established, in which more than 230,000 men enrolled. Wherever troops were quartered in any number, classes were organized and instruction given in practically every subject taught in the public schools of the United States, as well as in trade and business subjects. At Beaune a huge university was established for advanced instruction and approximately 9,000 soldiers registered to take the course.

    An Education Corps Commission was formed to direct all lecturers, schools and extension courses in the A.E.F. The men selected as instructors for the schools were competent educators with previous experience. This often resulted in classes for officers being conducted by privates from the ranks. The educational system on the whole was democratic, well planned and produced very substantial results.

    Horse shows were held by nearly every division, and many of the units organized theatrical troupes, which traveled throughout the A. E. F. giving performances. These activities were encouraged and aided in every way by the army officials, and to a large extent contributed to the pleasure and contentment of the troops.

    The men were also encouraged to participate in sports and games, and a great athletic program was carried out which culminated in the Inter-Allied Games held near Paris in June and July, 1919. Upon the invitation of the American Commander-in-Chief, eighteen of the Allied and associated nations sent contestants to this meet, which was a remarkable success from every standpoint. The Pershing Stadium, where it took place, was built mainly by engineers from the American Army. The funds were donated by the Young Men's Christian Association, which presented the structure to General Pershing. It was later turned over by him to the French people.

    In the spring of 1919 a composite regiment of selected officers and men was formed from the Third Army. Selection was based on appearance, soldierly qualities and war record. It was used as an escort of honor to the American Commander-in-Chief, and paraded in Paris, London and other places, including New York and Washington, D. C., when the regiment returned to America.

    In the meantime the transfer of troops to the United States had been progressing rapidly. Marshal Foch wished to retain a large force, at least 15 divisions, in Europe, but was told that the American Army would be withdrawn as soon as possible. President Wilson finally agreed that American representation in the occupied territory would be a small detachment only, to be known as the "American Forces in Germany", which would serve, as the French said, merely to keep the American flag on the Rhine.

    By May 19, 1919, all American combat divisions, except five in occupied German territory, had received their embarkation orders to sail for American ports.

    The units of the Army of Occupation were relieved as fast as practicable during the summer of 1919, and the 1st Division, the last large organization to leave for home, began its movement on August 15. With the dissolution of the Third Army on July 2, 1919, the "American Forces in Germany" consisting of about 6,800 men came into being and remained on the Rhine for more than three years. The American flag on Fort Ehrenbreitstein was finally lowered on January 24, 1923, when the last of the American troops in Germany entrained. The American zone was formally turned over to the French three days later on.

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    1918 - 1923
    3/6 Reactivated for maneuvers
    3/6 was reactivated June 14, 1922, at Quantico, Virginia, as the 3rd Battalion, 6th Regiment and assigned to the 4th Brigade.
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    1922
    3/6 Deactivated
    Deactivated August 10, 1922, at Quantico, Virginia
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    1922
    WWI Victory Medal
    Criteria
    The World War I Victory Medal was awarded for military service during the First World War. It was awarded for active service between April 6, 1917, and November 11, 1918; for service with the American ... More
    1919
    3/6 Deactivated following WWI
    They returned during Julyâ??August 1919 to Quantico, Virginia. The battalion was deactivated August 20, 1919
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    1919
    French Croix De Guerre WWI
    Devices : Silver Star CDG
    Criteria
    The Croix de guerre 1914�1918 is a French military decoration, the first version of the Croix de guerre. It was created to recognize French and allied soldiers who were cited for their service durin ... More
    1918
    Battalion Indian Head Patch
    During World War I the Fifth and Sixth Marines fought in France as the Fourth Marine Brigade of the US Army's 2nd Infantry Division were forced to wear the Army's uniform. The Marines had only the eag ... More
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    1918
    Battle of Belleau Wood
    The Battle of Belleau Wood (1–26 June 1918) occurred during the German Spring Offensive in World War I, near the Marne River in France. The battle was fought between the U.S. 2nd (under the comm ... More
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    1918 - 1918
    Battle of Chateau-Thierry
    The Battle of Château-Thierry was fought on July 18, 1918 and was one of the first actions of the American Expeditionary Forces (AEF) under General John J. "Black Jack" Pershing. It wa ... More
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    1918 - 1918
    World War I/Aisne-Marne Campaign
    Aisne-Marne, 18 July - 6 August 1918. Several days before the Germans launched their abortive Champagne-Marne drive, the French high command had made plans for a general converging offensive against t ... More
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    1918 - 1918
    World War I/Aisne-Marne Campaign
    Aisne-Marne, 18 July - 6 August 1918. Several days before the Germans launched their abortive Champagne-Marne drive, the French high command had made plans for a general converging offensive against t ... More
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    1918 - 1918
    World War I/St. Mihiel Campaign
    St. Mihiel, 12 - 16 September 1918. By September 1918, with both the Marne and the Amiens salients eliminated, there remained but one major threat to lateral rail communications behind the Allied line ... More
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    1918 - 1918
    World War I/Meuse-Argonne Campaign
    Meuse-Argonne, 26 September - 11 November 1918. At the end of August Marshal Foch had submitted plane to the national commanders for a final offensive along the entire Western Front, with the objectiv ... More
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    1918 - 1918
    3/6 Activated WWI
    3rd Battalion 6th Marines was activated on August 14, 1917, at Quantico, Virginia, as the 3rd Battalion, 6th Regiment.
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    1917
     
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