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Unit Details

Strength
Battalion
Type
Ground Unit
 
Existing/Disbanded
Existing

Description
2nd Battalion, 6th Marines (2/6) is an infantry battalion in the United States Marine Corps based out of Camp Lejeune, North Carolina. Also known as "The Ready Battalion" or "2/6 Spartans", it consists of approximately 800 Marines and Sailors and falls under the command of the 6th Marine Regiment and the 2nd Marine Division.

The mission of the battalion is to locate, close with and destroy the enemy by fire and maneuver or repel the enemy's assault with fire and close combat.

Reports To
6th Marine Regiment
 
Active Reporting Units
 
Inactive Reporting Unit
 
Unit Documents
 6th Marines History & Lineage


Unit Web Links
Solant Amity 1960-1962, Golf/2/6

The 6th Marine Regiment in Iceland 1941-42
1440 Members Who Served in This Unit


 

  • Abernathy, Jason, Cpl, (1992-1996)
  • Ace, Aron, LCpl, (2007-2010)
  • Adams, Benjamin, Cpl, (2002-2006)
  • Adams, Benjamin, Cpl, (2002-2006)
  • Adams, Bobby, SSgt, (1996-2008)
  • Adams, John Porter, LtCol, (1915-1945)
  • Adams, Sam, Col, (1961-1989)
  • Ainscoe, Al, Cpl, (1980-1984)
  • Albarado, Michael, Cpl, (1993-1997)
  • Albrecht, Nathanial, Sgt, (2004-Present)
  • Aldo, Stephen, SSgt, (1974-1985)
  • Alejandre, Angel, SSgt, (1998-2014)
  • Alfaro, Derik, PFC, (1998-2003)
  • Alley, Brian, LCpl, (1984-1987)
  • Alvarez, Brian, Cpl, (1998-2002)
  • Alvarez, James, LCpl, (2006-2009)
  • Amedee, Brett, MSgt, (1994-2008)
  • Ammer, Steven, GySgt, (1996-Present)
  • Amonette, Alden, Sgt, (1973-1977)
  • Amos, Jeremiah, Sgt, (2002-2007)
  • Amos, Jeremiah, SSgt, (2002-Present)
  • Anderson, Michael C., Sgt, (1965-1969)
  • Anderson, Virgil, PFC, (1945-1946)
  • Andrews, Bobby Maxwell, MSgt, (1944-1972)
  • Angel, Mark, Cpl, (1997-2002)
  • Angelicchi, Joe, LCpl, (2007-2010)
  • Angulogarcia, Martin, LCpl, (2004-2008)
  • Armentrout, Frank, Cpl, (1969-1972)
  • Armstrong, Gayle, HM1, (1967-1988)
  • Arnold, J., Sgt, (1995-2008)
  • Arnwine, Ronald, Cpl, (1979-1986)
  • Arriaga, Ramon fox 2/4 68-69, LCpl, (1968-1970)
  • Asher, James, Cpl, (1976-1982)
  • Attaway, Ron, LtCol, (1978-2002)
  • Attebury, Robert, SSgt, (2003-Present)
  • Atz, Mark, GySgt, (1994-Present)
  • Audette, Todd, Sgt, (1981-1986)
  • Aulette, Chris, Sgt, (1985-1991)
  • Bacallao, Dan, LCpl, (1983-1986)
  • Backus, Richard, Cpl, (1985-1989)
  • Bahar, David, SSgt, (2002-Present)
  • Baker, Robert, LCpl, (1980-1984)
  • Barba, Ernesto, Cpl, (2003-2007)
 

Unit Citations - Display as Table
 
Associated Patches
5986.jpg 6389.jpg 6700.jpg
 
Unit History
 
Battle/Operations History
  • US Occupation of Germany (Nov 1918 - Jan 1923)




    THE ...

     
    Unit Timeline
    Navy Meritorious Unit Commendation
    Criteria
    The Meritorious Unit Commendation may be awarded by the Secretary of the Navy to any unit of the Navy or Marine Corps that distinguishes itself under combat or noncombat conditions by either valorous ... More
    2014
    History of the 2nd Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment.
    World War I The 2nd Battalion, 6th Marines was activated on July 11, 1917 at Marine Corps Base, Quantico, Virginia to serve as reinforcements for the 4th Marine Brigade (5th Marine Regiment) alread ... More
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    2014
    Navy Unit Commendation
    Criteria
    The Navy Unit Commendation may be awarded by the Secretary of the Navy to any unit of the Navy or Marine Corps that distinguishes itself by outstanding heroism in action against an enemy (but not suff ... More
    Descriptions
    Iraq
    2007
    Iraq Campaign Medal
    Criteria
    The area of eligibility encompasses all land area of the country of Iraq and the contiguous water area out to 12 nautical miles, and all air spaces above the land area of Iraq and above the contiguous ... More
    Descriptions
    Sep 2005 to Apr 2006, the entire battalion deployed to Fallujah Iraq in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom.
    2006
    Navy Presidential Unit Citation
    Criteria
    The Presidential Unit Citation may be awarded to units of the Armed Forces of the United States and cobelligerent nations for extraordinary heroism in action against an armed enemy occurring on or aft ... More
    Descriptions
    Invasion of Iraq
    2003
    Afghanistan Campaign Medal
    Criteria
    To be eligible for the Afghanistan Campaign Medal, a Service member must be assigned or attached to a unit participating in Operation Enduring Freedom for 30 consecutive days or for 60 nonconsecutive ... More
    Descriptions
    Feb to May 2003, the entire battalion deployed and took part in Operation Enduring Freedom.
    2003
    Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal
    Criteria
    Individuals authorized the award of this medal must have been deployed abroad for service in the Global War on Terrorism operations on or after September 11, 2001, and to a future date to be determine ... More
    2002
    Global War on Terrorism Service Medal
    Criteria
    Individuals authorized the award of this medal must have participated in or served in support of Global War on Terrorism operations on or after September 11, 2001 and to a future date to be determined ... More
    2001
    Kosovo Campaign Medal
    Criteria
    Service members must be bona fide members of a unit participating in, or be engaged indirect support of, the operation for 30 consecutive days in the area of operations or for 60 non-consecutive days ... More
    Descriptions
    April to May 2000, Echo Company and elements of H&S deploy to Kosovo and take part in Operation Dynamic Response.
    2000
    Joint Meritorious Unit Award
    Criteria
    The Joint Meritorious Unit Award is presented in the name of the Secretary of Defense to Joint Activities of the Department of Defense for meritorious achievement or service, superior to that which is ... More
    1996
    Joint Meritorious Unit Award
    Criteria
    The Joint Meritorious Unit Award is presented in the name of the Secretary of Defense to Joint Activities of the Department of Defense for meritorious achievement or service, superior to that which is ... More
    Descriptions
    2/6 serves s the tactical reserve for Operation Joint Endeavor implementation services forces (IFOR) and on numerous occasions as the stand-by TRAP force for Operation Deny Flight.
    1996
    Navy Unit Commendation
    Criteria
    The Navy Unit Commendation may be awarded by the Secretary of the Navy to any unit of the Navy or Marine Corps that distinguishes itself by outstanding heroism in action against an enemy (but not suff ... More
    Descriptions
    Desert Shield/Desert Storm
    1991
    Navy Meritorious Unit Commendation
    Criteria
    The Meritorious Unit Commendation may be awarded by the Secretary of the Navy to any unit of the Navy or Marine Corps that distinguishes itself under combat or noncombat conditions by either valorous ... More
    1988
    US Multinational Force Lebanon Peacekeeping Mission

    The U.S. Multinational Force (USMNF) operated in Beirut, Lebanon from 25 August 1982 to 26 February 1984. During this period four different MAUs served as peacekeepers. The terrorist bombing of the ... More

    Israeli-Palestinian fighting in July 1981 was ended by a cease-fire arranged by U.S. President Ronald Reagan's special envoy, Philip C. Habib, and announced on July 24, 1981. The cease-fire was respected during the next 10 months, but a string of incidents, including PLO rocket attacks on northern Israel, led to the 06 June 1982, Israeli ground attack into Lebanon to remove PLO forces. Israeli forces moved quickly through south Lebanon, encircling west Beirut by mid-June and beginning a three-month siege of Palestinian and Syrian forces in the city.

    Throughout this period, which saw heavy Israeli air, naval, and artillery bombardments of west Beirut, Ambassador Habib worked to arrange a settlement. In August 1982, he was successful in bringing about an agreement for the evacuation of Syrian troops and PLO fighters from Beirut. The agreement also provided for the deployment of a three-nation Multinational Force (MNF) during the period of the evacuation, and by late August 1982, U.S. Marines, as well as French and Italian units, had arrived in Beirut. On 10 August 1982 the alert posture of the Mediterranean Amphibious Ready Group was heightened in light of a likely deployment as part of a peacekeeping force to oversee the evacuation of Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) forces from West Beirut.

    The 32d Marine Amphibious Unit (MAU) from Camp Lejeune deployed to Beirut to oversee the safe departure of thousands of Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) fighters out of the war-torn city. On 24 August (EDP), the first of 800 Marines began going ashore at Beirut as part of a joint U.S.-French peacekeeping force. When the evacuation ended, these units departed. On 8 September, following the removal of the PLO forces from West Beirut, the Marines redeployed aboard the MARG ships. The US Marines left on 10 September 1982.

    In spite of the invasion, the Lebanese political process continued to function, and Bashir Gemayel was elected President in August, succeeding Elias Sarkis. On September 14, however, Bashir Gemayel was assassinated. On 15 September 1982, Israeli troops entered west Beirut. During the next three days, Lebanese militiamen massacred hundreds of Palestinian civilians in the Sabra and Shatila refugee camps in west Beirut. Bashir Gemayel's brother, Amine, was elected President by a unanimous vote of the parliament. He took office 23 September 1982.

    MNF forces returned to Beirut at the end of September 1982 as a symbol of support for the government. On 22 September 1982, following the Phalangist Christian force massacre of Palestinians in the Sabra and Shatilla refugee camps, the Mediterranean Amphibious ready Group was ordered to the Eastern Mediterranean. President Ronald Reagan ordered the 32d MAU back into Lebanon to support the Lebanese Armed Forces where it was soon relieved by Camp Lejeune's 24th MAU. The 1st Battalion, 8th Marines Headquarters building was located at the Beirut International Airport and housed the Battalion Landing Team (BLT). From 27 September through 21 January 1983, two carriers were tethered to Lebanon to provide support for the Marine Corps forces ashore. On 11 February 1983, the response posture for carrier support was relaxed as the situation had stabilized. In February 1983, a small British contingent joined the U.S., French, and Italian MNF troops in Beirut.

    On 17 May 1983, an agreement was signed by the representatives of Lebanon, Israel, and the United States that provided for Israeli withdrawal. Syria declined to discuss the withdrawal of its troops, effectively stalemating further progress.

    The USMNF was initially successful; but, as the strategic and tactical situations changed, the peacekeepers came increasingly under fire. Opposition to the negotiations and to US support for the Gemayel regime led to a series of terrorist attacks in 1983 and 1984 on US interests, including the bombing on 18 April 1983 of the US embassy in west Beirut (63 dead), and of the US embassy annex in east Beirut on 20 September 1984 (8 killed).

    Just before 6:30 a.m. on Oct. 23, 1983, a Mercedes truck passed a Lebanese checkpoint on the airport road without halting. The truck turned into the airport parking lot, circled twice and picked up speed for a deadly run at the headquarters building. Orders prohibited Marines from being locked and loaded, but small arms fire probably would not have made much difference, according to reports. A sentry did get some shots off with a pistol, however. The driver of the speeding van was determined to put a huge dent in the American presence in Lebanon. After breaking through several barriers, it sped between two sentry boxes and crashed through more obstacles, penetrating the building's first floor before detonating tons of explosives, taking the lives of 241 Marines, Sailors and soldiers, a majority of which were stationed at Camp Lejeune. Most died in their sleep or were crushed as the building collapsed, while a handful have died in the years that followed due to injuries sustained from the bombing.

    On 3 December 1983, two F-14s flying over Lebanon were fired upon by Syrian antiaircraft artillery. On 4 December 1983, aircraft from Kennedy and Independence were launched against Syrian targets; two were shot down, and one U.S. airman was taken prisoner by Syrian troops.

    The virtual collapse of the Lebanese army in February 1984, following the defection of many of its Muslim and Druze units to opposition militias, was a major blow to the government. As it became clear that the departure of the US Marines was imminent, the Gemayel Government came under increasing pressure from Syria and its Muslim Lebanese allies to abandon the May 17 accord. On 26 February 1984, the withdrawal of the USMC contingent of the international peacekeeping force was completed. The Lebanese Government announced on 05 March 1984 that it was canceling its unimplemented agreement with Israel.

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    1982 - 1984
    Navy Unit Commendation
    Criteria
    The Navy Unit Commendation may be awarded by the Secretary of the Navy to any unit of the Navy or Marine Corps that distinguishes itself by outstanding heroism in action against an enemy (but not suff ... More
    Descriptions
    Beirut, Lebanon
    1983
    Navy Meritorious Unit Commendation
    Criteria
    The Meritorious Unit Commendation may be awarded by the Secretary of the Navy to any unit of the Navy or Marine Corps that distinguishes itself under combat or noncombat conditions by either valorous ... More
    1980
    Cuban Missile Crisis
    The Cuban Missile Crisis, also known as the Caribbean Crisis or the Missile Scare, was a 13-day (October 16-28, 1962) confrontation between the United States and the Soviet Union concerning American b ... More
    History Icon
    1961 - 1963
    Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal
    Criteria
    The Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal was awarded for for qualifying service within the Asiatic-Pacific Theater of Operations between December 7, 1941, and March 2, 1946, under any of the following condi ... More
    Descriptions
    Okinawa Shima, Ryukyu Islands. Floating reserve in Apr 1945.
    1945
    World War II Victory Medal
    Criteria
    The World War II Victory Medal commemorates military service during the Second World War.
    Descriptions
    Under the provisions of ALNAV #353-45, dated 22 October 1945, the battalion is eligible for the World War II Victory Medal and are authorized to wear the World War II Victory Ribbon, by reason of havi ... More
    1945
    Defense of Iceland Base
    On 7 July 1941, the defence of Iceland was transferred from Britain to the (still officially neutral) United States, by agreement with Iceland, and US marines replaced the British. Iceland's strategic ... More
    History Icon
    1941 - 1945
    Battle for Okinawa
    The Battle of Okinawa, codenamed Operation Iceberg. was fought on the Ryukyu Islands of Okinawa and was the largest amphibious assault in the Pacific War of World War II. The 82-day-long battle lasted ... More
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    1945 - 1945
    Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal
    Criteria
    The Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal was awarded for for qualifying service within the Asiatic-Pacific Theater of Operations between December 7, 1941, and March 2, 1946, under any of the following condi ... More
    Descriptions
    Tinian Island, Northern Marianas Islands.
    1944
    Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal
    Criteria
    The Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal was awarded for for qualifying service within the Asiatic-Pacific Theater of Operations between December 7, 1941, and March 2, 1946, under any of the following condi ... More
    Descriptions
    Saipan Island, Northern Marianas Islands.
    1944
    Battle for Saipan

    The Battle of Saipan was a battle of the Pacific campaign of World War II, fought on the island of Saipan in the Mariana Islands from 15 June–9 July 1944. The Allied invasion fleet embarking ... More

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    1944 - 1944
    Battle of Tinian (1944)
    The 2nd and 4th Marine Divisions landed on 24 July 1944, supported by naval bombardment and artillery firing across the strait from Saipan. A successful feint for the major settlement of Tinian Town d ... More
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    1944 - 1944
    Navy Presidential Unit Citation
    Criteria
    The Presidential Unit Citation may be awarded to units of the Armed Forces of the United States and cobelligerent nations for extraordinary heroism in action against an armed enemy occurring on or aft ... More
    Descriptions
    Tarawa
    1943
    Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal
    Criteria
    The Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal was awarded for for qualifying service within the Asiatic-Pacific Theater of Operations between December 7, 1941, and March 2, 1946, under any of the following condi ... More
    Descriptions
    Guadalcanal Island, British Solomon Islands.
    1943
    Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal
    Criteria
    The Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal was awarded for for qualifying service within the Asiatic-Pacific Theater of Operations between December 7, 1941, and March 2, 1946, under any of the following condi ... More
    Descriptions
    Tarawa Atoll, British Gilbert Islands.
    1943
    Guadalcanal Campaign (1942-43)
    The Guadalcanal Campaign, also known as the Battle of Guadalcanal and codenamed Operation Watchtower by Allied forces, was a military campaign fought between 7 August 1942 and 9 February 1943 on and a ... More
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    1942 - 1943
    Battle of Tarawa
    The Battle of Tarawa (US code name Operation Galvanic) was a battle in the Pacific Theater of World War II, fought from November 20 to November 23, 1943. It took place at the Tarawa Atoll in the Gilbe ... More
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    1943 - 1943
    American Campaign Medal
    Criteria
    The American Campaign Medal was awarded for For thirty days service outside the Continental United States but within the American Theater of Operations between December 7, 1941, and March 2, 1946; or, ... More
    1942
    Europe-Afica-Middle Eastern Campaign
    Criteria
    The European-African-Middle Eastern Campaign Medal was awarded for for qualifying service within the European-African-Middle Eastern Theater of Operations between December 7, 1941, and March 2, 1946, ... More
    Descriptions
    Jul 1941 to Mar 1942, participated in the occupation of Iceland.
    1942
    American Defense Service Medal
    Criteria
    The American Defense Service Medal was awarded for service in the Armed Forces between September 8, 1939, and December 7, 1941. Army members had to serve 12 months to be eligible, but Navy and Marine ... More
    1941
    China Service Medal
    Criteria
    The China Service Medal was awarded to Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard personnel who: Served ashore in China or who were attached to any of the vessels that operated in support of the operations in ... More
    1937
    US Occupation of Germany

    THE Armistice was signed at 5:00 o'clock in the morning of November 11, 1918, on Marshall Foch's train in the Forest of Compiegne, and took effect at 11: 00 a. m. on the same day.< ... More

    Its terms, which are summarized on pages 507-509, required Germany to evacuate all invaded and occupied territory in Belgium, Luxemburg and France (including Alsace-Lorraine), and to withdraw her armies across the Rhine River. They also provided that the Allied forces should be permitted peaceably to occupy bridgeheads, 18 miles in radius, east of the Rhine at Mayence, Coblenz and Cologne, and that a neutral zone 6 miles wide in which neither the Allies nor Germany could maintain troops would be established along the east bank of the Rhine and around each of the bridgeheads.

    The advance of the American and Allied Armies was so regulated that they occupied all territory evacuated by the Germans within a short time after the German troops withdrew. The plans fer the advance prescribed that the French should move through Alsace-Lorraine to Mayence, the Americans through Luxemburg and the Moselle valley to Coblenz, the British to Cologne, and the Belgians by way of Aix-la-Chapelle to the lower Rhine River.

    On November 7 the Commander-in-Chief of the American Expeditionary Forces had directed that an American Third Army be organized and on November 14 this Army, with Major General Joseph T. Dickman as commander, was designated as the Army of Occupation. It was composed initially of the III Corps, containing the 2d, 32d and 42d Divisions; and the IV Corps, comprising the 1st, 3d and 4th Divisions. To these were added on November 22 the VII Corps, containing the 5th, 89th and 90th Divisions. On that same day the Third Army detached the 5th Division from the VII Corps and gave it the duty of guarding the extended lines of communication of the Army.

    The advance to the Rhine was begun by the Americans and Allies on November 17 along the entire Western Front. Although active operations against a hostile enemy were not involved, there were nevertheless many difficult problems to be met. For the Americans, these included the creation in a limited time of a staff and services for the supply and rapid movement of more than 200,000 men through country where transportation lines in many places were completely destroyed and where food was scarce. Moreover, the weather was cold and rainy and in many places the roads were nearly impassable. Although the troops had been hastily assembled and had been allowed no opportunity to rest and refit after the trying period of the Meuse­Argonne offensive, they cheerfully met every demand made upon them. The advance elements of the Third Artillery passed through the city of Luxemburg on November 21 and arrived two days later at the German frontier. There they rested until December 1 when all of the Armies of Occupation pushed on into Germany.

    Through the liberated districts of France and Luxemburg the Americans were received with wild demonstrations of joy, but upon entering Germany they were regarded with a mixture of curiosity and suspicion. However, the fine conduct of the Army and the firmness and justice of the American commanders quickly quieted any apprehensions the civil population may have had and no incidents of hostility took place.

    The leading troops of the Third Army reached the Rhine River on December 9. On the 13th, American, French and British infantry divisions crossed the river, having been preceded in some cases by advance elements the day before. In the American Third Army, the III Corps, whose composition had been changed to include the 1st, 2d and 32d Divisions, was designated to occupy the northern portion of the bridgehead at Coblenz, the southern portion having been transferred to French control. The American bridgehead included the fortress of Ehrenbreitstein located immediately across the Rhine River from Coblenz and dominating it.

    The III Corps crossed on four bridges—two at Coblenz, and one each at Engers and Remagen below Coblenz and by the night of December 14 had completed the occupation of the American part of the bridgehead. The remainder of the American Army of Occupation, consisting of the IV Corps, comprising the 3d, 4th and 42d Divisions, and the VII Corps, containing the 89th and 90th Divisions, remained west of the Rhine. Luxemburg was occupied by the 5th and 33d Divisions, both of which were under command of the American Second Army, and not under control of the Army of Occupation.

    To the south of Coblenz the French occupied a bridgehead with headquarters at Mayence, while to the north, the British occupied a bridgehead with headquarters at Cologne. Although the Belgians advanced to the Rhine and occupied jointly with the French a zone in the Rhineland to the north of the British, with headquarters at Aix-la-Chapelle, they had no force across the river.

    An additional bridgehead at Kehl across the Rhine from Strasbourg and including the ring of forts of that place,was established on February 4, 1919, by the French on their own responsibility.

    When finally located on December 21, 1918, the headquarters of the principal units of the American Army of Occupation in Germany were placed as follows:

    Third Army — Coblenz

    III Corps — Neuwied

    IV Corps — Cochem

    VII Corps — Wittlich

    1st Division — Montabaur

    2d Division — Heddesdorf

    3d Division — Andernach

    4th Division — Bad Bertrich

    32d Division — Rengsdorf

    42d Division — Ahrweiler

    89th Division — Kylburg

    90th Division — Berncastel

    Immediately after the Armistice the American Commander-in-Chief started preparations for moving his forces back to the United States with the least possible delay. The Services of Supply was promptly reorganized to carry out the intricate details connected with this work, and approximately 25,500 men of the American forces actually sailed from France, homeward bound, in November. Before the end of the year this number had been increased to about 124,000.

    Upon the cessation of hostilities practically every man of the 2,000,000 in the A.E.F. wanted to return to the United States at once; but with the limited number of ships available this was, of course, impossible. While military training was continued after the Armistice against the remote possibility that operations might be resumed, the higher commanders realized that this was a most trying period for the soldiers and undertook measures to make life for them as interesting as possible commensurate with the maintenance of a satisfactory standard of discipline and military conduct.

    Men were allowed regular leaves to visit leave areas established at various summer and winter resorts in France and in the occupied portion of Germany, and arrangements were made whereby they could visit several other countries such as Great Britain, Belgium and Italy.

    A vast school system was established, in which more than 230,000 men enrolled. Wherever troops were quartered in any number, classes were organized and instruction given in practically every subject taught in the public schools of the United States, as well as in trade and business subjects. At Beaune a huge university was established for advanced instruction and approximately 9,000 soldiers registered to take the course.

    An Education Corps Commission was formed to direct all lecturers, schools and extension courses in the A.E.F. The men selected as instructors for the schools were competent educators with previous experience. This often resulted in classes for officers being conducted by privates from the ranks. The educational system on the whole was democratic, well planned and produced very substantial results.

    Horse shows were held by nearly every division, and many of the units organized theatrical troupes, which traveled throughout the A. E. F. giving performances. These activities were encouraged and aided in every way by the army officials, and to a large extent contributed to the pleasure and contentment of the troops.

    The men were also encouraged to participate in sports and games, and a great athletic program was carried out which culminated in the Inter-Allied Games held near Paris in June and July, 1919. Upon the invitation of the American Commander-in-Chief, eighteen of the Allied and associated nations sent contestants to this meet, which was a remarkable success from every standpoint. The Pershing Stadium, where it took place, was built mainly by engineers from the American Army. The funds were donated by the Young Men's Christian Association, which presented the structure to General Pershing. It was later turned over by him to the French people.

    In the spring of 1919 a composite regiment of selected officers and men was formed from the Third Army. Selection was based on appearance, soldierly qualities and war record. It was used as an escort of honor to the American Commander-in-Chief, and paraded in Paris, London and other places, including New York and Washington, D. C., when the regiment returned to America.

    In the meantime the transfer of troops to the United States had been progressing rapidly. Marshal Foch wished to retain a large force, at least 15 divisions, in Europe, but was told that the American Army would be withdrawn as soon as possible. President Wilson finally agreed that American representation in the occupied territory would be a small detachment only, to be known as the "American Forces in Germany", which would serve, as the French said, merely to keep the American flag on the Rhine.

    By May 19, 1919, all American combat divisions, except five in occupied German territory, had received their embarkation orders to sail for American ports.

    The units of the Army of Occupation were relieved as fast as practicable during the summer of 1919, and the 1st Division, the last large organization to leave for home, began its movement on August 15. With the dissolution of the Third Army on July 2, 1919, the "American Forces in Germany" consisting of about 6,800 men came into being and remained on the Rhine for more than three years. The American flag on Fort Ehrenbreitstein was finally lowered on January 24, 1923, when the last of the American troops in Germany entrained. The American zone was formally turned over to the French three days later on.

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    1918 - 1923
    WWI Victory Medal
    Criteria
    The World War I Victory Medal was awarded for military service during the First World War. It was awarded for active service between April 6, 1917, and November 11, 1918; for service with the American ... More
    Descriptions
    Eligible for the World War I Victory Medal and authorized to wear the World War I Victory Ribbon, by reason of having served honorably in the U.S. Marine Corps, Navy or Coast Guard, at any time during ... More
    1919
    French Croix De Guerre WWI
    Criteria
    The Croix de guerre 1914�1918 is a French military decoration, the first version of the Croix de guerre. It was created to recognize French and allied soldiers who were cited for their service durin ... More
    1918
    French Croix De Guerre WWI
    Criteria
    The Croix de guerre 1914�1918 is a French military decoration, the first version of the Croix de guerre. It was created to recognize French and allied soldiers who were cited for their service durin ... More
    1918
    Somme Defensive Campaign
    Somme Defensive, 21 March - 6 April 1918. The German high command decided to attack on the British-held Somme front in the direction of Amiens. A breakthrough at this point would separate the French f ... More
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    1918 - 1918
    Somme Defensive Campaign
    Somme Defensive, 21 March - 6 April 1918. The German high command decided to attack on the British-held Somme front in the direction of Amiens. A breakthrough at this point would separate the French f ... More
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    1918 - 1918
    Battle of Belleau Wood
    The Battle of Belleau Wood (1–26 June 1918) occurred during the German Spring Offensive in World War I, near the Marne River in France. The battle was fought between the U.S. 2nd (under the comm ... More
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    1918 - 1918
    Battle of Chateau-Thierry
    The Battle of Château-Thierry was fought on July 18, 1918 and was one of the first actions of the American Expeditionary Forces (AEF) under General John J. "Black Jack" Pershing. It wa ... More
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    1918 - 1918
    Champagne-Marne Campaign
    Champagne-Marne, 15 - 18 July 1918. In the four great offensives from 21 March to 13 June 1918 the Germans gained considerable ground, but failed to achieve a decisive advantage at any point on the fr ... More
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    1918 - 1918
    Champagne-Marne Campaign
    Champagne-Marne, 15 - 18 July 1918. In the four great offensives from 21 March to 13 June 1918 the Germans gained considerable ground, but failed to achieve a decisive advantage at any point on the fr ... More
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    1918 - 1918
    Aisne-Marne Campaign
    Aisne-Marne, 18 July - 6 August 1918. Several days before the Germans launched their abortive Champagne-Marne drive, the French high command had made plans for a general converging offensive against t ... More
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    1918 - 1918
    Aisne-Marne Campaign
    Aisne-Marne, 18 July - 6 August 1918. Several days before the Germans launched their abortive Champagne-Marne drive, the French high command had made plans for a general converging offensive against t ... More
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    1918 - 1918
    St. Mihiel Campaign
    St. Mihiel, 12 - 16 September 1918. By September 1918, with both the Marne and the Amiens salients eliminated, there remained but one major threat to lateral rail communications behind the Allied line ... More
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    1918 - 1918
    Meuse-Argonne Campaign
    Meuse-Argonne, 26 September - 11 November 1918. At the end of August Marshal Foch had submitted plane to the national commanders for a final offensive along the entire Western Front, with the objectiv ... More
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    1918 - 1918
    Meuse-Argonne Campaign
    Meuse-Argonne, 26 September - 11 November 1918. At the end of August Marshal Foch had submitted plane to the national commanders for a final offensive along the entire Western Front, with the objectiv ... More
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    1918 - 1918
    French Croix De Guerre WWI
    Criteria
    The Croix de guerre 1914�1918 is a French military decoration, the first version of the Croix de guerre. It was created to recognize French and allied soldiers who were cited for their service durin ... More
    1917
     
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