Patch
Unit Details

Strength
Regiment
Type
Ground Unit
 
Existing/Disbanded
Existing
Year
1917 - Present

Description
The activation of the Fifth Marines dates back to June 1917, just prior to the U.S. force deployment to France during World War I. The Regiment won its nickname, the “Fighting Fifth,” on the battlefields of western Europe. So fierce were its efforts in the Battle of Belleau Wood and subsequent victories that the French government awarded the Regiment the Croix de Guerre with two palms and one gilt star. Today, each Marine serving in the Regiment also wears the Fourragere, a French unit award, on the left shoulder of his uniform to recognize the legacy and valor of his predecessors.

5th Marines and 6th Marines – 1918 Battle of Belleau Wood – Awarded the Fourragere aux couleurs de la Croix de guerre with palm leaf three times.






















Briefly deactivated, the Regiment was reactivated in June 1920, to guard the delivery of the U.S. Mail against domestic bandits. While they were on the job, not one Marine was killed and not one piece of mail was lost to thieves. In March 1927, the Regiment deployed to South America and fought in support of the Nicaraguan government against rebel bands until April 1930. Shortly thereafter, the Regiment was again briefly deactivated. Troubled times and small conflicts in the Americas however, led to the Regiment’s reactivation on 1 September 1934.

After further service in the U.S. and in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, the Fifth Marines deployed to New Zealand in 1942 as part of the U.S. Pacific Campaign against Japan. During the course of World War II, the Regiment further distinguished itself in action at Guadalcanal, Eastern New Guinea, Peleliu and Okinawa. The post-war years found the Regiment on occupation duty in North China until May 1947, when it relocated to Guam. In August 1950, it moved to its current home, Camp Pendleton, California.

The country again called upon the Fifth Marines in August 1950, when the Regiment found itself in combat on the Pusan Perimeter in Korea. During the next three years the Regiment fought at Inchon and Seoul, the Chosin Reservoir, and on both the East Central and Western Fronts. The Fifth Marine Regiment returned to Camp Pendleton in March 1955, and remained there for the next eleven years.

In May 1966, the Fifth Marines arrived in the Republic of South Vietnam where it would remain until April 1971. Vietnam era Marines added the names Rung Sat, Chu Lai, Phu Bai, Hue, Khe Sahn, An Hoa, Tam Ky, and Da Nang to the Regiment’s long list of distinguished battle actions.

In August 1990, the nation again called on the “Fighting Fifth” – this time in support of Operation Desert Shield. On 26 January 1991, while embarked with the largest amphibious task force since World War II, Regimental Landing Team (RLT) Five, in conjunction with RLT-2, conducted heliborne and surface assaults for Exercise Sea Soldier IV in Southern Oman. On 25 February 1991, the Regiment disembarked in direct support of Operation Desert Storm and the liberation of Kuwait. Less than three months later, Fifth Marines received an executive order to conduct humanitarian assistance and relief operations in Bangladesh. The Regiment returned to Camp Pendleton on 29 June 1991.

In the decade following Operation Desert Storm, the Regiment deployed to Yellowstone National Park, the Umatilla National Forest in Oregon and Clear Creek, Idaho to combat wild fires. Simultaneously it sourced the battalion landing teams for the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (Special Operations Capable), or MEU (SOC).

In January of 2003, the Fifth Marines deployed to Kuwait to take part in Operation Iraqi Freedom. On 21 March, the Regiment became the first unit to cross the line of departure into Iraq as it moved to seize the Rumayllah Oilfields. During the course of the next few weeks, the Regiment repeatedly distinguished itself in combat actions as it continued the offensive to liberate Baghdad and collapse the regime of Saddam Hussein. During much of the attack north, the Regiment led the 1st Marine Division in the deepest attack in Marine Corps history.

Today, the Regiment continues to participate in exercises and contingency deployments with the 1st Marine Division, and to prepare forces for deployment with the 31st MEU (SOC). Ever ready to answer the nation’s call, the “Fighting Fifth” is recognized as the Marine Corps’ most highly decorated regiment.
 

Reports To
Infantry Units
 
Active Reporting Units
 
Inactive Reporting Unit
None
 
1870 Members Who Served in This Unit


 

  • Abela, Chris, CPL, (1997-2001)
  • Abraham, Ron, MSgt, (1993-Present)
  • Adams, Bryce, SSgt, (1992-2012)
  • Adams, Don, LCpl, (1984-1988)
  • Aguirre, Felix, SSgt, (1974-1981)
  • Akalaonu, John, Capt, (2001-2007)
  • Albaugh, Paul, SSgt, (2003-2011)
  • Albright, David, CPL, (1982-1986)
  • Alessi, Frank, MGySgt, (1986-Present)
  • Alexander, Chad, SSgt, (2002-2015)
  • Alexander, Jr., Robert W., MSgt, (1986-2010)
  • Alexander, Larry, Sgt, (1965-1969)
  • Algarin, Gabriel, 2ndLt, (1996-Present)
  • Allen, Anthony, SgtMaj, (1978-2009)
  • Allison, Ricky(Rick), CPL, (1965-1968)
  • Allwerdt, Karl, MGySgt, (1990-2011)
  • Almeda, Bryon, Maj, (1998-Present)
  • Amos, Sonny, Sgt, (1965-1971)
  • Anda, Michael, Maj, (1992-Present)
  • ANDERSON, CARY, SSgt, (1996-2007)
  • Anderson, John, CPL, (1965-1969)
  • Anderson, Keith M., CPL, (1976-1980)
  • Anderson, Marbin, Sgt, (1969-1972)
  • Andrews, G., Sgt, (1976-1981)
  • Anglim, Donald, Sgt, (1950-1954)
  • Anguiano, Frank, CPL, (1979-1983)
  • Apache, Jimmie, PFC, (1944-1946)
  • Apodaca, Nick, GySgt, (1990-2010)
  • Aquaviva, Bill, Sgt, (1984-1992)
  • Arnold, Thomas, LtCol, (1988-2010)
  • Arrant, Michael, Sgt, (2001-2005)
  • Arredondo, Christopher, SCPO, (2002-Present)
  • Arredondo, Ramon D, LCpl, (1968-1972)
  • Arruda, Anthony, PFC, (1998-2001)
 

Unit Citations - Display as Table
 
Associated Patches
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Associations
 
Unit History
 
Battle/Operations History
  • US Occupation of Germany (Nov 1918 - Jan 1923)




    THE ...

    • Operation Inherent Resolve (OIR) (Oct 2014 - 3000)


      ...
       
      Unit News and Information
      Unit Photos (Jan 10, 2017) 2
      Photo Album
       
      Unit Timeline
      Operation Inherent Resolve (OIR)

      As of 15 October 2014, the U.S. military operation name Operation Inherent Resolve officially refers to the US's military actions against ISIL, specifically the campaign in Iraq an ... More

      Operation Inherent Resolve (OIR) is the U.S. military's operational name for the military intervention against the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL, in the vernacular, Daesh), including both the campaign in Iraq and the campaign in Syria. Effective 22 September 2015, U.S. Army III Corps is responsible for Combined Joint Task Force – Operation Inherent Resolve (CJTF-OIR). A change of command from III Corps to XVIII Airborne Corps is expected in late summer 2016.

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      2014 - 3000
      Notable Members
      William W. Ashurst, Brigadier General, USMC. Served with 18th Company, 2nd Battalion during World War I. Lewis K. Bausell, Corporal, received Medal of Honor while served with 1st Battalion during Bat ... More
      History Icon
      2017
      Navy Meritorious Unit Commendation
      Criteria
      The Meritorious Unit Commendation may be awarded by the Secretary of the Navy to any unit of the Navy or Marine Corps that distinguishes itself under combat or noncombat conditions by either valorous ... More
      2015
      Transition I (2011-14)
      2012: Strategic Agreement
      Taliban attacks continued at the same rate as they did in 2011, remaining around 28,000 Taliban "enemy initiated" attacks.

      Reformation of the ... More
      History Icon
      2011 - 2014
      Navy Presidential Unit Citation
      Criteria
      The Presidential Unit Citation may be awarded to units of the Armed Forces of the United States and cobelligerent nations for extraordinary heroism in action against an armed enemy occurring on or aft ... More
      Descriptions
      Afghanistan
      2009
      OIF/Iraqi Surge (2007-08)
      In the context of the Iraq War, the surge refers to United States President George W. Bush's 2007 increase in the number of American troops in order to provide security to Baghdad and Al Anbar Provinc ... More
      History Icon
      2007 - 2008
      Navy Unit Commendation
      Criteria
      The Navy Unit Commendation may be awarded by the Secretary of the Navy to any unit of the Navy or Marine Corps that distinguishes itself by outstanding heroism in action against an enemy (but not suff ... More
      Descriptions
      Iraq 28Feb06-9Feb07 SU I MEF (FWD)
      2007
      OIF/National Resolution (2006-07)
      Elections for a new Iraqi National Assembly were held under the new constitution on 15 December 2005. This election used a proportional system, with approximately 25% of the seats required to be fille ... More
      History Icon
      2005 - 2007
      OIF/Iraqi Governance (2004-05)
      In June 2004, under the auspices of United Nations Security Council Resolution 1546 the Coalition transferred limited sovereignty to a caretaker government, whose first act was to begin the trial of S ... More
      History Icon
      2004 - 2005
      Navy Presidential Unit Citation
      Criteria
      The Presidential Unit Citation may be awarded to units of the Armed Forces of the United States and cobelligerent nations for extraordinary heroism in action against an armed enemy occurring on or aft ... More
      Descriptions
      Iraq
      2003
      Joint Meritorious Unit Award
      Criteria
      The Joint Meritorious Unit Award is presented in the name of the Secretary of Defense to Joint Activities of the Department of Defense for meritorious achievement or service, superior to that which is ... More
      2003
      OIF/Liberation of Iraq (2003)
      The 2003 invasion of Iraq lasted from 19 March to 1 May 2003 and signaled the start of the conflict that later came to be known as the Iraq War, which was dubbed Operation Iraqi Freedom by the United ... More
      History Icon
      2003 - 2003
      Navy Unit Commendation
      Criteria
      The Navy Unit Commendation may be awarded by the Secretary of the Navy to any unit of the Navy or Marine Corps that distinguishes itself by outstanding heroism in action against an enemy (but not suff ... More
      Descriptions
      Gulf War
      1991
      Operation Sea Angel 1991
      Humanitarian Relief Operation after massive typhoon in Bangledesh.
      History Icon
      1991 - 1991
      Operation Desert Shield
      In 1990, fellow Arab Gulf states refused to endorse Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein's plan to cut production and raise the price of oil, leaving him frustrated and paranoid. Iraq had incurred a mountain o ... More
      History Icon
      1990 - 1991
      Operation Desert Storm
      On January 16, 1991, President George H. W. Bush announced the start of what would be called Operation Desert Storm—a military operation to expel occupying Iraqi forces from Kuwait, which Iraq h ... More
      History Icon
      1991 - 1991
      NEO - Operation Fiery Vigil (Philippines)
      Operation Fiery Vigil was the emergency evacuation of all non-essential military and United States Department of Defense civilian personnel and their dependents from Clark Air Base and U.S. Naval Base ... More
      History Icon
      1991 - 1991
      NEO - Operation New Arrivals (Vietnam)
      Construction of tent camps aboard Camp Pendleton to support the arrival & processing of Vietnamese, Cambodians & others evacuating Vietnam.
      History Icon
      1975 - 1975
      Navy Presidential Unit Citation
      Criteria
      The Presidential Unit Citation may be awarded to units of the Armed Forces of the United States and cobelligerent nations for extraordinary heroism in action against an armed enemy occurring on or aft ... More
      Descriptions
      Vietnam 16Sep67-31Oct68 SU 1st MarDiv (See Individual Unit Listings)
      1968
      Navy Presidential Unit Citation
      Criteria
      The Presidential Unit Citation may be awarded to units of the Armed Forces of the United States and cobelligerent nations for extraordinary heroism in action against an armed enemy occurring on or aft ... More
      Descriptions
      For extraordinary heroism in action against North Vietnamese forces during Operations UNION and UNION II in the Que Son area, Republic of Vietnam, from 25 April to 5 June 1967. Throughout this period, ... More
      1968
      Navy Meritorious Unit Commendation
      Criteria
      The Meritorious Unit Commendation may be awarded by the Secretary of the Navy to any unit of the Navy or Marine Corps that distinguishes itself under combat or noncombat conditions by either valorous ... More
      Descriptions
      Vietnam 23Jul-23Oct68
      1968
      Operation Hue City
      The Battle of Huế during 1968 from January 30 to March 3, (also called the Siege of Huế), was one of the bloodiest and longest battles of the Vietnam War (1959–1975). Battalions of t ... More
      History Icon
      1968 - 1968
      Navy Presidential Unit Citation
      Criteria
      The Presidential Unit Citation may be awarded to units of the Armed Forces of the United States and cobelligerent nations for extraordinary heroism in action against an armed enemy occurring on or aft ... More
      Descriptions
      Vietnam 29Mar66-15Sep67 SU 1st MarDiv (See Individual Unit Listings)
      1967
      Operation Union I / Lien Ket 102
      Apr 21 – May 17; 1st Battalion, 1st Marines, 2nd Battalion, 1st Marines, 1st Battalion, 5th Marines, 3rd Battalion, 5th Marines and ARVN 1st Ranger Group search and destroy operation in the Que ... More
      History Icon
      1967 - 1967
      Operation Union II
      May 25 – Jun 5; 1st Battalion, 5th Marines, 2nd Battalion, 5th Marines, 3rd Battalion, 5th Marines, 1st Battalion, 7th Marines, 2nd Battalion, 7th Marines and ARVN 6th Regiment search and destro ... More
      History Icon
      1967 - 1967
      Operation Swift
      Operation Swift (September 4–15, 1967) was a military operation that took place in the Vietnam War. The mission, involving forces of the 1st Marine Division, was carried out to rescue two Marine ... More
      History Icon
      1967 - 1967
      Vietnam Gallantry Cross Unit Citation
      Criteria
      The Republic of Vietnam Meritorious Unit Citation (Gallantry Cross Colors) was authorized to be worn by units individually cited for service in military operations in support of the government of Sout ... More
      1966
      Vietnam Civil Actions Unit Citation
      Criteria
      The unit citation of the Republic of Vietnam Civil Actions Medal was awarded certain units by the Vietnamese government for meritorious service during the period 1 March 1961 to 28 March 1974.
      1966
      Cuban Missile Crisis
      The Cuban Missile Crisis, also known as the Caribbean Crisis or the Missile Scare, was a 13-day (October 16-28, 1962) confrontation between the United States and the Soviet Union concerning American b ... More
      History Icon
      1962 - 1962
      Navy Unit Commendation
      Criteria
      The Navy Unit Commendation may be awarded by the Secretary of the Navy to any unit of the Navy or Marine Corps that distinguishes itself by outstanding heroism in action against an enemy (but not suff ... More
      Descriptions
      Korea
      1953
      Korean Presidential Unit Citation
      Criteria
      The Republic of Korea Presidential Unit Citation is a military unit award issued by the government of South Korea to both South Korean and foreign military units.
      1952
      Navy Presidential Unit Citation
      Criteria
      The Presidential Unit Citation may be awarded to units of the Armed Forces of the United States and cobelligerent nations for extraordinary heroism in action against an armed enemy occurring on or aft ... More
      Descriptions
      Korea
      1951
      Navy Presidential Unit Citation
      Criteria
      The Presidential Unit Citation may be awarded to units of the Armed Forces of the United States and cobelligerent nations for extraordinary heroism in action against an armed enemy occurring on or aft ... More
      Descriptions
      Korea
      1950
      Navy Presidential Unit Citation
      Criteria
      The Presidential Unit Citation may be awarded to units of the Armed Forces of the United States and cobelligerent nations for extraordinary heroism in action against an armed enemy occurring on or aft ... More
      Descriptions
      Korea
      1950
      Pusan Perimeter breakout
      Meanwhile, 5th Marines came ashore at Inchon. The last North Korean troops in South Korea still fighting were defeated when Walton H. Walker's 8th Army broke out of the Pusan Perimeter, joining the Ar ... More
      History Icon
      1950 - 1950
      Inchon Landing/Operation Chromite
      (September 15–26, 1950) in the Korean War, an amphibious landing by U.S. and South Korean forces at the port of Inchon, near the South Korean capital, Seoul. A daring operation planned and execu ... More
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      1950 - 1950
      Battle of the Chosin Reservoir (Battle of Changjin)
      The Battle of Chosin Reservoir, also known as the Chosin Reservoir Campaign or the Changjin Lake Campaign was a decisive battle in the Korean War. "Chosin" is the Japanese pronunciation of t ... More
      History Icon
      1950 - 1950
      Operation Beleaguer (China)
      Operation Beleaguer was a major United States military operation that took place in northeastern China's Hopeh and Shantung Provinces between 1945 and 1949. The main objectives of the operation were t ... More
      History Icon
      1945 - 1949
      Navy Presidential Unit Citation
      Criteria
      The Presidential Unit Citation may be awarded to units of the Armed Forces of the United States and cobelligerent nations for extraordinary heroism in action against an armed enemy occurring on or aft ... More
      Descriptions
      World War II - Okinawa
      1945
      Battle for Okinawa
      The Battle of Okinawa, codenamed Operation Iceberg. was fought on the Ryukyu Islands of Okinawa and was the largest amphibious assault in the Pacific War of World War II. The 82-day-long battle lasted ... More
      History Icon
      1945 - 1945
      Navy Presidential Unit Citation
      Criteria
      The Presidential Unit Citation may be awarded to units of the Armed Forces of the United States and cobelligerent nations for extraordinary heroism in action against an armed enemy occurring on or aft ... More
      Descriptions
      World War II - Peleliu, Ngesebus
      1944
      Battle of Cape Gloucester
      The Battle of Cape Gloucester (26 December 1943 - 22 April 1944) was a battle in the Pacific theater of World War II, which took place between late December 1943 and April 1944, on the island of New B ... More
      History Icon
      1943 - 1944
      Battle of Peleliu
      The Battle of Peleliu, codenamed Operation Stalemate II, was fought between the United States and the Empire of Japan in the Pacific Theater of World War II, from September–November 1944 on the ... More
      History Icon
      1944 - 1944
      New Guinea Campaign (1942-44)
      (New Guinea Campaign 24 January 1943 to 31 December 1944) After the loss of Buna and Gona in New Guinea, the Japanese fell back on their stronghold at Lae. Their attempt to reinforce Lae by sea in Mar ... More
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      1943 - 1944
      Guadalcanal Campaign (1942-43)
      The Guadalcanal Campaign, also known as the Battle of Guadalcanal and codenamed Operation Watchtower by Allied forces, was a military campaign fought between 7 August 1942 and 9 February 1943 on and a ... More
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      1942 - 1943
      Navy Presidential Unit Citation
      Criteria
      The Presidential Unit Citation may be awarded to units of the Armed Forces of the United States and cobelligerent nations for extraordinary heroism in action against an armed enemy occurring on or aft ... More
      Descriptions
      World War II 7Aug-9Dec42 SU 1st MarDiv
      1942
      US Occupation of Nicaragua
      The United States occupation of Nicaragua from 1912 to 1933 was part of the Banana Wars, when American troops forcefully intervened with various Latin American countries from 1898 to 1934. The formal ... More
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      1912 - 1926
      US Occupation of Germany

      THE Armistice was signed at 5:00 o'clock in the morning of November 11, 1918, on Marshall Foch's train in the Forest of Compiegne, and took effect at 11: 00 a. m. on the same day.< ... More

      Its terms, which are summarized on pages 507-509, required Germany to evacuate all invaded and occupied territory in Belgium, Luxemburg and France (including Alsace-Lorraine), and to withdraw her armies across the Rhine River. They also provided that the Allied forces should be permitted peaceably to occupy bridgeheads, 18 miles in radius, east of the Rhine at Mayence, Coblenz and Cologne, and that a neutral zone 6 miles wide in which neither the Allies nor Germany could maintain troops would be established along the east bank of the Rhine and around each of the bridgeheads.

      The advance of the American and Allied Armies was so regulated that they occupied all territory evacuated by the Germans within a short time after the German troops withdrew. The plans fer the advance prescribed that the French should move through Alsace-Lorraine to Mayence, the Americans through Luxemburg and the Moselle valley to Coblenz, the British to Cologne, and the Belgians by way of Aix-la-Chapelle to the lower Rhine River.

      On November 7 the Commander-in-Chief of the American Expeditionary Forces had directed that an American Third Army be organized and on November 14 this Army, with Major General Joseph T. Dickman as commander, was designated as the Army of Occupation. It was composed initially of the III Corps, containing the 2d, 32d and 42d Divisions; and the IV Corps, comprising the 1st, 3d and 4th Divisions. To these were added on November 22 the VII Corps, containing the 5th, 89th and 90th Divisions. On that same day the Third Army detached the 5th Division from the VII Corps and gave it the duty of guarding the extended lines of communication of the Army.

      The advance to the Rhine was begun by the Americans and Allies on November 17 along the entire Western Front. Although active operations against a hostile enemy were not involved, there were nevertheless many difficult problems to be met. For the Americans, these included the creation in a limited time of a staff and services for the supply and rapid movement of more than 200,000 men through country where transportation lines in many places were completely destroyed and where food was scarce. Moreover, the weather was cold and rainy and in many places the roads were nearly impassable. Although the troops had been hastily assembled and had been allowed no opportunity to rest and refit after the trying period of the Meuse­Argonne offensive, they cheerfully met every demand made upon them. The advance elements of the Third Artillery passed through the city of Luxemburg on November 21 and arrived two days later at the German frontier. There they rested until December 1 when all of the Armies of Occupation pushed on into Germany.

      Through the liberated districts of France and Luxemburg the Americans were received with wild demonstrations of joy, but upon entering Germany they were regarded with a mixture of curiosity and suspicion. However, the fine conduct of the Army and the firmness and justice of the American commanders quickly quieted any apprehensions the civil population may have had and no incidents of hostility took place.

      The leading troops of the Third Army reached the Rhine River on December 9. On the 13th, American, French and British infantry divisions crossed the river, having been preceded in some cases by advance elements the day before. In the American Third Army, the III Corps, whose composition had been changed to include the 1st, 2d and 32d Divisions, was designated to occupy the northern portion of the bridgehead at Coblenz, the southern portion having been transferred to French control. The American bridgehead included the fortress of Ehrenbreitstein located immediately across the Rhine River from Coblenz and dominating it.

      The III Corps crossed on four bridges—two at Coblenz, and one each at Engers and Remagen below Coblenz and by the night of December 14 had completed the occupation of the American part of the bridgehead. The remainder of the American Army of Occupation, consisting of the IV Corps, comprising the 3d, 4th and 42d Divisions, and the VII Corps, containing the 89th and 90th Divisions, remained west of the Rhine. Luxemburg was occupied by the 5th and 33d Divisions, both of which were under command of the American Second Army, and not under control of the Army of Occupation.

      To the south of Coblenz the French occupied a bridgehead with headquarters at Mayence, while to the north, the British occupied a bridgehead with headquarters at Cologne. Although the Belgians advanced to the Rhine and occupied jointly with the French a zone in the Rhineland to the north of the British, with headquarters at Aix-la-Chapelle, they had no force across the river.

      An additional bridgehead at Kehl across the Rhine from Strasbourg and including the ring of forts of that place,was established on February 4, 1919, by the French on their own responsibility.

      When finally located on December 21, 1918, the headquarters of the principal units of the American Army of Occupation in Germany were placed as follows:

      Third Army — Coblenz

      III Corps — Neuwied

      IV Corps — Cochem

      VII Corps — Wittlich

      1st Division — Montabaur

      2d Division — Heddesdorf

      3d Division — Andernach

      4th Division — Bad Bertrich

      32d Division — Rengsdorf

      42d Division — Ahrweiler

      89th Division — Kylburg

      90th Division — Berncastel

      Immediately after the Armistice the American Commander-in-Chief started preparations for moving his forces back to the United States with the least possible delay. The Services of Supply was promptly reorganized to carry out the intricate details connected with this work, and approximately 25,500 men of the American forces actually sailed from France, homeward bound, in November. Before the end of the year this number had been increased to about 124,000.

      Upon the cessation of hostilities practically every man of the 2,000,000 in the A.E.F. wanted to return to the United States at once; but with the limited number of ships available this was, of course, impossible. While military training was continued after the Armistice against the remote possibility that operations might be resumed, the higher commanders realized that this was a most trying period for the soldiers and undertook measures to make life for them as interesting as possible commensurate with the maintenance of a satisfactory standard of discipline and military conduct.

      Men were allowed regular leaves to visit leave areas established at various summer and winter resorts in France and in the occupied portion of Germany, and arrangements were made whereby they could visit several other countries such as Great Britain, Belgium and Italy.

      A vast school system was established, in which more than 230,000 men enrolled. Wherever troops were quartered in any number, classes were organized and instruction given in practically every subject taught in the public schools of the United States, as well as in trade and business subjects. At Beaune a huge university was established for advanced instruction and approximately 9,000 soldiers registered to take the course.

      An Education Corps Commission was formed to direct all lecturers, schools and extension courses in the A.E.F. The men selected as instructors for the schools were competent educators with previous experience. This often resulted in classes for officers being conducted by privates from the ranks. The educational system on the whole was democratic, well planned and produced very substantial results.

      Horse shows were held by nearly every division, and many of the units organized theatrical troupes, which traveled throughout the A. E. F. giving performances. These activities were encouraged and aided in every way by the army officials, and to a large extent contributed to the pleasure and contentment of the troops.

      The men were also encouraged to participate in sports and games, and a great athletic program was carried out which culminated in the Inter-Allied Games held near Paris in June and July, 1919. Upon the invitation of the American Commander-in-Chief, eighteen of the Allied and associated nations sent contestants to this meet, which was a remarkable success from every standpoint. The Pershing Stadium, where it took place, was built mainly by engineers from the American Army. The funds were donated by the Young Men's Christian Association, which presented the structure to General Pershing. It was later turned over by him to the French people.

      In the spring of 1919 a composite regiment of selected officers and men was formed from the Third Army. Selection was based on appearance, soldierly qualities and war record. It was used as an escort of honor to the American Commander-in-Chief, and paraded in Paris, London and other places, including New York and Washington, D. C., when the regiment returned to America.

      In the meantime the transfer of troops to the United States had been progressing rapidly. Marshal Foch wished to retain a large force, at least 15 divisions, in Europe, but was told that the American Army would be withdrawn as soon as possible. President Wilson finally agreed that American representation in the occupied territory would be a small detachment only, to be known as the "American Forces in Germany", which would serve, as the French said, merely to keep the American flag on the Rhine.

      By May 19, 1919, all American combat divisions, except five in occupied German territory, had received their embarkation orders to sail for American ports.

      The units of the Army of Occupation were relieved as fast as practicable during the summer of 1919, and the 1st Division, the last large organization to leave for home, began its movement on August 15. With the dissolution of the Third Army on July 2, 1919, the "American Forces in Germany" consisting of about 6,800 men came into being and remained on the Rhine for more than three years. The American flag on Fort Ehrenbreitstein was finally lowered on January 24, 1923, when the last of the American troops in Germany entrained. The American zone was formally turned over to the French three days later on.

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      1918 - 1923
      French Croix De Guerre WWI
      Devices : Silver Gilt Star
      Criteria
      The Croix de guerre 1914�1918 is a French military decoration, the first version of the Croix de guerre. It was created to recognize French and allied soldiers who were cited for their service durin ... More
      1918
      Battle of Belleau Wood
      The Battle of Belleau Wood (1–26 June 1918) occurred during the German Spring Offensive in World War I, near the Marne River in France. The battle was fought between the U.S. 2nd (under the comm ... More
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      1918 - 1918
      Battle of Chateau-Thierry
      The Battle of Château-Thierry was fought on July 18, 1918 and was one of the first actions of the American Expeditionary Forces (AEF) under General John J. "Black Jack" Pershing. It wa ... More
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      1918 - 1918
      World War I/Aisne-Marne Campaign
      Aisne-Marne, 18 July - 6 August 1918. Several days before the Germans launched their abortive Champagne-Marne drive, the French high command had made plans for a general converging offensive against t ... More
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      1918 - 1918
      World War I/Aisne-Marne Campaign
      Aisne-Marne, 18 July - 6 August 1918. Several days before the Germans launched their abortive Champagne-Marne drive, the French high command had made plans for a general converging offensive against t ... More
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      1918 - 1918
      World War I/St. Mihiel Campaign
      St. Mihiel, 12 - 16 September 1918. By September 1918, with both the Marne and the Amiens salients eliminated, there remained but one major threat to lateral rail communications behind the Allied line ... More
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      1918 - 1918
      World War I/Meuse-Argonne Campaign
      Meuse-Argonne, 26 September - 11 November 1918. At the end of August Marshal Foch had submitted plane to the national commanders for a final offensive along the entire Western Front, with the objectiv ... More
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      1918 - 1918
       
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