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Unit Details

Strength
Service
Type
HQ/Command Elements
 
Existing/Disbanded
Existing
Year
1775 - Present

Description

The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the United States Armed Forces responsible for providing power projection, using the mobility of the United States Navy to, by Congressional mandate, rapidly deliver combined-arms task forces on land, at sea, and in the air. The U.S. Marine Corps is one of the four armed service branches in the U.S. Department of Defense and one of the seven uniformed services of the United States. The current Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, the highest-ranking military officer in the U.S. armed forces, is a Marine Corps general.

The Marine Corps has been a component of the U.S. Department of the Navy since 30 June 1834, working closely with naval forces for training, transportation, and logistics. The USMC operates posts on land and aboard sea-going amphibious warfare ships around the world, and several of the Marines' tactical aviation squadrons, primarily Marine Fighter Attack squadrons, are also embedded in Navy carrier air wings and operate from the Navy's nuclear-powered aircraft carriers.[9]

Two battalions of Continental Marines were formed on 10 November 1775 in Philadelphia as a service branch of infantry troops capable of fighting for independence both at sea and on shore. The role of the Corps has since grown and evolved, expanding to aerial warfare and earning popular titles such as, "America's third air force", and, "second land army". The United States Marine Corps has distinguished itself as it has served in the majority of American wars and armed conflicts, from its inception to the modern era, and attained prominence in the 20th century when its theories and practices of amphibious warfare proved prescient and ultimately formed the cornerstone of the Pacific theater of World War II.

By the mid-20th century, the U.S. Marine Corps had become a major theorist of and the world's dominant practitioner of amphibious warfare. Its ability to rapidly respond on short notice to expeditionary crises gives it a strong role in the implementation and execution of American foreign policy. As of 2016, the USMC has around 182,000 active duty members and some 38,900 reserve Marines. It is the smallest of the U.S. armed forces within the U.S. DoD.



Notable Persons
Chesty - 5 Navy Crosses - LtGen Lewis Burwell Puller
Frozen Chosin - Korea
Medal of Honor (2 awards) VeraCruz Mexico & Haiti - MGen Smedley D. Butler
Two time Medal of Honor Receipent
first African-American Marine officer - Capt Frederick Clinton Branch
first African-American Marine officer
"Grand old man of the Marine Corps," longest-serving Commandant - BGen Archibald Henderson
"Grand old man of the Marine Corps," longest-serving Commandant of the Marine Corps (1820–1859) (5th Commandant of the Marine Corps)
first woman to join the United States Marine Corps - Sgt Opha Mae Jacob Johnson
the first woman to enlist in the United States Marine Corps. She joined the Marine Corps Reserve in 1918, officially becoming the first female Marine
 
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Unit Web Links
Marines.mil
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Unit History
 
Battle/Operations History
 
Unit News and Information
Marines execute helicopter support exercises (Oct 20, 2009) 
  • Marines from Landing Support Company, Combat Logistics Regiment 27, 2nd Marine Logistics Group, hook cargo to a CH-53E Super Stallion during a helicopter support training exercise, Oct. 13, 2009, aboard Camp Lejeune, N.C. HSTs allow LS specialist and aircrews to practice the intricate process of moving cargo attached to the bottom of a helicopter., <b>Lance Cpl. Tommy Bellegarde, 10/14/2009 12:57 AM</b>

    Marines from Landing Support Company, Combat Logistics Regiment 27, 2nd Marine Logistics Group, hook cargo to a CH-53E Super Stallion during a helicopter support training exercise, Oct. 13, 2009, aboard Camp Lejeune, N.C. HSTs allow LS specialist and aircrews to practice the intricate process of moving cargo attached to the bottom of a helicopter., Lance Cpl. Tommy Bellegarde, 10/14/2009 12:57 AM

  • Marines from Landing Support Company, Combat Logistics Regiment 27, 2nd Marine Logistics Group, hook cargo to a CH-53E Super Stallion during a helicopter support training exercise, Oct. 13, 2009, aboard Camp Lejeune, N.C. HSTs allow LS specialist and aircrews to practice the intricate process of moving cargo attached to the bottom of a helicopter., <b>Lance Cpl. Tommy Bellegarde, 10/14/2009 12:56 AM</b>

    Marines from Landing Support Company, Combat Logistics Regiment 27, 2nd Marine Logistics Group, hook cargo to a CH-53E Super Stallion during a helicopter support training exercise, Oct. 13, 2009, aboard Camp Lejeune, N.C. HSTs allow LS specialist and aircrews to practice the intricate process of moving cargo attached to the bottom of a helicopter., Lance Cpl. Tommy Bellegarde, 10/14/2009 12:56 AM

Marines from Landing Support Company, Combat Logistics Regiment 27, 2nd Marine Logistics Group, hook cargo to a CH-53E Super Stallion during a helicopter support training exercise, Oct. 13, 2009, aboard Camp Lejeune, N.C. HSTs allow LS specialist and aircrews to practice the intricate process of moving cargo attached to the bottom of a helicopter., <b>Lance Cpl. Tommy Bellegarde, 10/14/2009 12:57 AM</b> 
Marines from Landing Support Company, Combat Logistics Regiment 27, 2nd Marine Logistics Group, hook cargo to a CH-53E Super Stallion during a helicopter support training exercise, Oct. 13, 2009, aboard Camp Lejeune, N.C. HSTs allow LS specialist and aircrews to practice the intricate process of moving cargo attached to the bottom of a helicopter., <b>Lance Cpl. Tommy Bellegarde, 10/14/2009 12:56 AM</b> 
The glow sticks from Marines of Landing Support Company, Combat Logistics Regiment 27, 2nd Marine Logisitcs Group, and the lights on a CH-53E Super Stallion illuminate the night during a helicopter support training exercise, Oct. 13, 2009, aboard Camp Lejeune, N.C. The Marines use glow sticks and hand signals to communicate beneath the large, powerful helicopters., <b>Lance Cpl. Tommy Bellegarde, 10/14/2009 1:15 AM</b> 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Marines from Landing Support Company, Combat Logistics Regiment 27, 2nd Marine Logistics Group, hook cargo to a CH-53E Super Stallion during a helicopter support training exercise, Oct. 13, 2009, aboard Camp Lejeune, N.C. HSTs allow LS specialist and aircrews to practice the intricate process of moving cargo attached to the bottom of a helicopter., Lance Cpl. Tommy Bellegarde, 10/14/2009 12:57 AM
Marines from Landing Support Company, Combat Logistics Regiment 27, 2nd Marine Logistics Group, hook cargo to a CH-53E Super Stallion during a helicopter support training exercise, Oct. 13, 2009, aboard Camp Lejeune, N.C. HSTs allow LS specialist and aircrews to practice the intricate process of moving cargo attached to the bottom of a helicopter., Lance Cpl. Tommy Bellegarde, 10/14/2009 12:56 AM
The glow sticks from Marines of Landing Support Company, Combat Logistics Regiment 27, 2nd Marine Logisitcs Group, and the lights on a CH-53E Super Stallion illuminate the night during a helicopter support training exercise, Oct. 13, 2009, aboard Camp Lejeune, N.C. The Marines use glow sticks and hand signals to communicate beneath the large, powerful helicopters., Lance Cpl. Tommy Bellegarde, 10/14/2009 1:15 AM
 
A clear, cool night with starry skies at a desolate field aboard Camp Lejeune was suddenly interrupted by a large, booming helicopter that produced hurricane-force winds in the faces of the Marines standing below.

As the hulking CH-53E Super Stallion descended from the sky, its overpowering rotors pressed the ground, turning even the tiniest dirt particles into painful projectiles.

Marines from Landing Support Company, Combat Logistics Regiment 27, 2nd Marine Logistics Group, conducted a helicopter support training exercise the evening of Oct. 13, 2009, where they practiced attaching a 6,000 lb. beam to a helicopter which was then airlifted away.

The purpose of helicopter transportation is to expedite the movement of cargo in a tactical situation where speed and maneuverability are needed.  The aircraft used in the operations, including the Corps’ new MV-22 Osprey, have the ability to move humvees, artillery, containers, and even other helicopters.

Helicopter support exercises such as this are conducted in order to familiarize LS specialist and aircraft crew members with the intricacies of airlift operations.

Pfc. Kerry Hotard, a landing support specialist with LS Company, said that during the exercise the Super Stallion pilots hoverd their helicopters a few feet over the Marines as they hooked up cargo to the bottom of the aircraft.

He said that HSTs can be dangerous and include the risk of electrocution if not done correctly. He explained that these risks can be minimized with the use of an anti-static wand, gloves and other personal protective equipment.

Despite the risks associated with their job, the Marines of LS Company say they love the dangerous and unique responsibilities.

“We have fun. We jump around, get blown around by the hurricane-force winds and just motivate each other,” Hotard said

And that’s exactly what happened…

As the helicopter hovered over the Marines, inching lower and lower, the deafening loudness of the propellers and the force of the winds would have intimidated anyone. Despite the insurmountable circumstances, these Marines skillfully and swiftly got the job done, using hand and arm signals with the aid of glow sticks to communicate with one another.

After each lift, team leader Cpl. Timothy L. Kackley, discussed with his Marines what they did well at and what they needed to improve upon for the next lift.

The HST lasted for six lifts and Kackley determined the exercise to be a success.

“We had a lot to work with difficulty-wise,” he said. “There was a lot of danger out there tonight – low tires and sling hooks. Overall, I think we overcame it pretty well.”

As the exercise came to a close, the LS specialists discussed with each other the fun they had just experienced as they loaded humvees up with their gear.

“I love my job!” exclaimed Kackley.

The LS Marines are recognizable by the distinctive red markings they wear on their uniforms, which date back to World War II when the markings were used to differentiate them from the infantry during crowded amphibious operations in the Pacific Campaign.

The height and color of the mark on the leg symbolizes stained fatigues in the bloody waters, said Kackley.

For more information on the II Marine Expeditionary Force, visit the unit’s web site at www.iimefpublic.usmc.mil.

 
Unit Timeline
Project Mercury Astronauts
Lieutenant Colonel John H. Glenn, Jr. was named as one of the original seven Project Mercury astronauts selected for space training. The seven astronauts, all volunteers, were selected by NASA from an ... More
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1959
First Marine aviation mission in the Korean War
Eight Corsairs of VMF-214, the famed "Black Sheep" squadron of World War II, launched from the USS Sicily and executed the first Marine aviation mission in the Korean War in a raid against ... More
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1950
Flag Raising Mt. Suribachi
Four days after the initial landings on Iwo Jima, 1stLt Harold G. Schrier led 40 men from Company E, 2d Battalion, 28th Marines, up Mt. Suribachi to secure the crest and raise the small American flag ... More
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1945
First Woman Officers
The first group of 71 Women Marine officer candidates arrived at the U.S. Midshipmen School (Women's Reserve) at Mount Holyoke College in South Hadley, Massachusetts. The Navy's willingness to share t ... More
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1943
First Pilot assigned
First Lieutenant Alfred A. Cunningham, the first Marine officer to be assigned to "duty in connection with aviation" by Major General Commandant William P. Biddle, reported for aviation trai ... More
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1912
First Medal Honor Recipient
Corporal John Mackie, the first Marine to earn the Medal of Honor, was commended for service in the USS Galena during action against Confederate shore batteries at Drewry's Bluff which blocked the Jam ... More
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1862
Marine Corps Beginnings
Leading up to the American Revolution, a committee of the Continental Congress met to draft a resolution calling for two battalions of Marines able to fight for independence at sea and on shore. The r ... More
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1775
 
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