Barden, John James, PFC

Fallen
 
 Service Photo 
 Service Details
View Time Line
Last Rank
Private 1st Class
Last Primary MOS
745-Rifleman
Last MOSGroup
WWI & WWII SSN/MOS
Primary Unit
1943-1943, 745, K Co, 3rd Bn, 2nd Marine Regiment (3/2)
Service Years
1940 - 1943
Official/Unofficial USMC Certificates
Golden Dragon Certificate
Shellback Certificate

Private 1st Class

 
 

 Last Photo 
 Personal Details 


Home State
Illinois
Illinois
Year of Birth
1924
 
This Military Service Page was created/owned by Sgt Edson Bellis to remember Marine PFC John James Barden.

If you knew or served with this Marine and have additional information or photos to support this Page, please leave a message for the Page Administrator(s) HERE.
 
Casualty Info
Home Town
Peoria
Last Address
Peoria

Casualty Date
Nov 20, 1943
 
Cause
Hostile, Died
Reason
Gun, Small Arms Fire
Location
Kiribati
Conflict
World War II
Location of Interment
Saint Mary's Cemetery - West Peoria, Illinois
Wall/Plot Coordinates
Plot 78 Blk C Sec Rg2 Grave 1

 Official Badges 

French Fourragere


 Unofficial Badges 

Order of the Golden Dragon Shellback


 Military Association Memberships
World War II FallenWW II Memorial National Registry
  2015, World War II Fallen
  2016, WW II Memorial National Registry

 Photo Album   (More...


 Ribbon Bar
Rifle Marksman (Pre 1959)USMC Basic Qualification Badge

 
 Enlisted/Officer Basic Training
  1940, Boot Camp (San Diego, CA)
 Unit Assignments
1st Bn, 6th Marine Regiment (1/6)3rd Bn, 2nd Marine Regiment (3/2), 2nd Marine Regiment
  1941-1942, 0311, C Co, 1st Bn, 6th Marine Regiment (1/6)
  1943-1943, 745, K Co, 3rd Bn, 2nd Marine Regiment (3/2)
 Combat and Non-Combat Operations
  1941-1945 World War II/American Theater/Defense of Iceland Base
  1943-1943 Gilbert Islands Operation (1943)/Battle of Tarawa
 Additional Information
Last Known Activity
PFC Barden was killed by a sniper's bullet on the Island of Tarawa in the South Pacific on 11-20-1943 while serving with the 2nd Marine Regiment of the 2nd Marine Division. He is the son Mr. & Mrs. John P. Barden of Peoria, Illinois, and he enlisted in the Marine Corps in October of 1940 and did his training at Camp Elliott, California.

BARDEN, John J., Pfc., USMC. Mother, Mrs. Josephine Barden, 713 Smith St., Peoria, Ill + BARDEN, John James, 298393, CoK, 3rdBn, 2ndMar, 2ndMarDiv, FMF, Gilbert Islands, November 20, 1943, killed in action
   
Comments/Citation
Tarawa (Gilbert Islands, Kiribati) - November 20 to November 23, 1943
Of the 3,636 Japanese in the garrison, only one officer and sixteen enlisted men surrendered.  Of the 1,200 Korean laborers brought to Tarawa to construct the defenses, only 129 survived.  All told, 4,690 of the island's defenders were killed.  The 2nd Marine Division suffered 894 killed in action, 48 officers and 846 enlisted men, while an additional 84 of the wounded survivors later succumbed to what proved to be fatal wounds.  Of these, 8 were officers and 76 were enlisted men.  A further 2,188 men were wounded in the battle, 102 officers and 2,086 men.  Of the roughly 12,000 2nd Marine Division marines on Tarawa, 3,166 officers and men became casualties.  Nearly all of these casualties were suffered in the 76 hours between the landing at 0910 20 November and the island being declared secure at 1330 23 November.  The Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (JPAC), investigated the cases of American servicemen who remain unaccounted for from the Battle of Tarawa, including 103 who are buried as "Unknown" in the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu. It is a tiny island; its main feature (and the reason for its capture) was a small airstrip that ran down its middle, almost from one beach to the other. Marines commented that, in most places on the island, a pitcher with a good arm could throw a baseball from one side to the other. Rather than one big cemetery, the Americans buried their dead in several smaller cemeteries where space and convenience permitted. They were marked as well as possible, understood to be temporary and left to the care of the garrison. When graves registration teams arrived after the war, they found an enormous mess and very few remains. The small cemeteries had been moved during the war to accommodate the expanding base and while the main cemetery had been spruced up (in advance of a visit from a LIFE magazine photographer) headstones often did not line up with graves or, indeed, follow the lines of burial at all. Many of the bodies had no identification, and identifying features were long gone. By the time the graves registration teams called it quits, they had repatriated a few score remains, returned a few dozen as unknown and left hundreds behind as simply unrecoverable.
   
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