Abelman, Norman Stanley, Pvt

Fallen
 
 Service Photo 
 Service Details
32 kb
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Last Rank
Private
Last Primary MOS
0311-Rifleman
Last MOSGroup
Infantry
Primary Unit
1944-1945, 521, 3rd Bn, 25th Marine Regiment (3/25)/H&S Co
Service Years
1944 - 1945
Official/Unofficial USMC Certificates
Iwo Jima Certificate

Private

 
 

 Last Photo 
 Personal Details 


Home State
District Of Columbia
Year of Birth
1919
 
This Military Service Page was created/owned by Pamela Jeans (Pam)-Historian to remember Marine Pvt Norman Stanley Abelman.

If you knew or served with this Marine and have additional information or photos to support this Page, please leave a message for the Page Administrator(s) HERE.
 
Casualty Info
Home Town
District of Columbia
Last Address
Washington, DC

Casualty Date
Mar 03, 1945
 
Cause
Hostile, Died
Reason
Gun, Small Arms Fire
Location
Japan
Conflict
World War II/World War II/Asiatic-Pacific Theater/Western Pacific Campaign (1944-45)/Battle of Iwo Jima
Location of Interment
Arlington National Cemetery - Arlington, Virginia
Wall/Plot Coordinates
Section 12 Site 6988

 Official Badges 


 Unofficial Badges 


 Military Association Memberships
World War II FallenWW II Memorial National RegistryThe National Gold Star Family Registry
  2014, World War II Fallen [Verified]
  2014, WW II Memorial National Registry
  2014, The National Gold Star Family Registry

 Photo Album   (More...


 Ribbon Bar

Rifle Marksman (Pre 1959)

 
 Enlisted/Officer Basic Training
  1944, Boot Camp (Parris Island, SC)
 Unit Assignments
MCRD (Cadre) Parris Island, SC/1st Recruit Training Bn3rd Bn, 25th Marine Regiment (3/25)
  1944-1944, MCRD (Cadre) Parris Island, SC/1st Recruit Training Bn
  1944-1945, 521, 3rd Bn, 25th Marine Regiment (3/25)/H&S Co
 Combat and Non-Combat Operations
  1941-1945 World War II
 Additional Information
Last Known Activity
The Battle of Iwo Jima (19 February – 26 March 1945), or Operation Detachment, was a major battle in which the United States Armed Forces fought for and captured the island of Iwo Jima from the Japanese Empire. The American invasion had the goal of capturing the entire island, including its three airfields (including South Field and Central Field), to provide a staging area for attacks on the Japanese main islands. This five-week battle comprised some of the fiercest and bloodiest fighting of the War in the Pacific of World War II.

Iwo Jima was the only battle by the U.S. Marine Corps in which the overall American casualties (killed and wounded) exceeded those of the Japanese, although Japanese combat deaths were thrice those of the Americans throughout the battle. Of the 22,000 Japanese soldiers on Iwo Jima at the beginning of the battle, only 216 were taken prisoner, some of whom were captured because they had been knocked unconscious or otherwise disabled. The majority of the remainder were killed in action, although it has been estimated that as many as 3,000 continued to resist within the various cave systems for many days afterwards, eventually succumbing to their injuries or surrendering weeks later.

Despite the bloody fighting and severe casualties on both sides, the Japanese defeat was assured from the start. Overwhelming American superiority in arms and numbers as well as complete control of air power — coupled with the impossibility of Japanese retreat or reinforcement — permitted no plausible circumstance in which the Americans could have lost the battle.
   
Comments/Citation
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